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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Sept. 2021: I was at a crossroad of trying to troubleshoot the multi-wire alternator problem I was having or switching over to a one-wire alternator. I chose to go with the one-wire option offered by Power Master Model 75691, but after 3 months the pulley came off with no warning on my way to work. This is an aluminum pressed on pulley with nothing else securing it to the shaft. JEGS sells them on their website.

Powermaster 75691: Chrysler Square Back Alternator 95 Amp [6-Groove 52 mm & Cone] 1-Wire Voltage Regulator - JEGS High Performance

I even suggested to the technician that I would pay extra to have the shaft exchanged out with one I felt more comfortable with, but he doubted they would agree to going that route. I was told that this is a rare, isolated incident (approximately one in five thousand). I told them they should recall their product, but that's not likely going to happen. It's still under warranty, and they've agreed to fix it, but my confidence of this "pressed-on" pulley is low. I should also mention that after the second multi-wire rebuilt alternator failed from NAPA, I had the third one installed just to carry me over until the new one-wire came in. If you notice from the pictures, this is a serpentine pulley on a model Rampage that probably came stock with the V-belt version. I used a 1987 Dodge Daytona Shelby Z in my search engine to come up with what I had installed in the Rampage. The other dilemma is to find a belt that'll fit this since that was the one part that got lost when this happened.

Any help with what I should do at this point would be appreciated. God bless.









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this picture you posted .. the bushing on the alternator bracket / hang bolt looks squeezed narrower at the top and the bolt looks ( to me kinda crooked).. if so that alone could have "steered" the pulley off the shaft and into the proverbial ditch..seeing as it's pressed on there's nothing to resist that "steering" force to the side
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
this picture you posted .. the bushing on the alternator bracket / hang bolt looks squeezed narrower at the top and the bolt looks ( to me kinda crooked).. if so that alone could have "steered" the pulley off the shaft and into the proverbial ditch..seeing as it's pressed on there's nothing to resist that "steering" force to the side View attachment 278162
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks so much for your input. Agreed about bushings condition, but I still feel that a belt should fail before a pulley comes off the shaft. I'll definitely be inspecting all the hardware once I get it apart. You'd think that they'd supply new bushings with the alternator (would polyurethane bushings be too stiff? - Do they even make any for alternators?). I just ordered a must stronger alternator. I'll try to post how it goes, but I'll likely have to change out the regulator connector. It's one for a 1985 Chrysler Laser 2.2L motor. A bit overkill, but check out the specs:

Powermaster 433111: Upgrade Alternator Natural Finish - JEGS High Performance


I found one on Ebay for about half the price.
 

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I'm pretty sure the rubber bushings or poly ones are available

I would suggest replacing them with the alternator

if the bushings allow the alternator to tilt outwards like it appears then the belts desire to return to it's unstreached length is going to continue to cause issues..that would likely be the force that removed the pulley from the shaft

if the alternator pulley hadn't come off you likely would have had a bad bearing in the front of that alternator in a few months leaving you thinkin' you had got jipped on that alternator

also, if you still have the original long bolt that the alternator hangs from it should have a 14mm head .. it also uses a unique 14mm nut.. a 15mm nut from some other place on the motor would seem to fit but they come lose in short order .. the first clue is the jingling of the big washer between the bushing and the nut..

took me a few turns retightening that nut ..in the way back.. before I'd figured out that little mistake
 

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If you get another one with a presed on pulley you could pop off the cone shaped cap and add some JB weld to the end to try to make sure that the pulley stays on.
 

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I will second the bushing issue, I installed PolyBushings alternator kit on my 88 T2 engine. I had issues on my 1985 with the same engine of the alternator "skewing" due to the soft rubber bushings. FWIW, the nut is a M10X1.5 prevailing torque design (looks like someone stepped on it) a self locking (nylon insert) can be used in place of it, or a jam nut. You also need to be sure you have a ground wire at least as big as the output wire as the mounts completely isolate the alternator electrically. On Powermaster alternators, I see a lot of issues with them on other vehicles (Ford Trucks) where people have gone to the one wire alternators. I have always preferred to stay with the factory systems, updating to newer sometimes as the factory does update problematic designs. Pressed on pulleys are nothing new, Chrysler has used them on alternators starting in 1960, big issue with aluminum, it expands at roughly twice the rate as steel and really should be a tight enough fit it needs to be heated for installation.

Ford had one that had a penchant for catching fire at the output connection because unlike Chrysler, they used a dual 5/16" blade connector followed by a fusible link and had the voltage sense for the internal regulator beyond the fusible link.
 

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to add if you're going to put it back together before you get new bushings (or have to ) then rotate the existing old bushings .. both of 'em , 180* .. so top becomes bottom and front becomes back
then at least you have the part of the bushings that haven't been squished for thirty odd years supporting the belt tension forces
then order the bushings
 

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Better check that bottom dogbone style mount bushing at the bottom of the alternator. Shown in background on pic # 6 & 8. On the L-bodies, they can wear really badly which causes the alternator to mount crooked. I really dislike this style alternator. This design predated the L-bodies, aside from being a one wire conversion, the design is old as dirt, going back into the 60's. The ND or Bosch or even the Chrysler Corporate alternator (which black plastic backplate) are much better choices. Unless I'm trying to keep a low mileage L-body bone stock, I typically change out every original style alternator as one of the first things I do when I purchase a new to me L-body. The larger car bottom mount is also a upgrade over the L-body bottom mount. Works best with the early (non-common block) waterpump housings.

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I completely agree with 4Lbodies. I always hated that dumb rubber alternator mounting set-up. The alternators were always cocked at an angle and made the belts wear and get noisy. I converted everything to the latest versions available. My favorite is the late model Nippondenso. They are physically smaller AND put out a lot of power. I love the original Chrysler square back alternators for my old RWD Mopars, but they were a pain on the FWD cars. They are MUCH more difficult to set the belt tension, and the bushings go bad if driven for a lot of miles. FWIW, I have never had any issues with the stock wiring on any of these alternators except for the positive lug ring terminal can vibrate and break if it is not properly mounted with the OE wiring holders.

As to your issue with the pulleys coming off, I have to agree it is a combination of the alternator being cocked at an angle AND the aluminum pulley. Going with either the Chrysler corporate alternator with the black plastic cover or the Nippondenso will solve both problems. The corporate alternator should bolt right up to your existing mounts. The down side is they are kind of rare now. The Nippondenso units are common as grass AND last longer, but you will need to change the mounts.

Good Luck!
 

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I agree, too.
I would just like to add that the adjustment of belt tension should be done very carefully tightening the bolts in the proper sequence. I would say that the lower mount bolt must be last, because it
must be allowed to swivel to its best position before it is tightened up.
In a lot of cases the rubber in the lower mount has cracked or torn due to improper alignment and not letting it swivel when, the belt is being tightened at the adjustment bolt.
 

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I think I see the/a problem--count the number of ribs the pullies have---it appears from/by the pix shown that some pullies have 3(4) ribs--the alt pulley shown has 5 ribs---I knew a person who went out of his mind with belt & pully problems until he found the cause that there was different # ribbed pullies---as far as pully coming off alt that should have never happened that is a mfg./rebuilder defect
 

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square back alternators were ok up high in the older cars but down low in an L body .. they sure don't like big puddles
the toboggan like splash shield under it doesn't help..maybe it even fills like a tub and drowns the alternator ?
 

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Here is a link to Johnny Spiva's polybushings :polyurethane Alternator bushings (polybushings.com)
and the isolator bracket is also available, altho not a poly bushing:
Alternator Isolator (polybushings.com)
The splash guard does have a drain hole, but I've seen them pack up with snow. It is a good idea to also use the splash guard for the distributor.
One thing about the isolator bracket: the original bolt that goes through the rubber bushing will not thread into the nut welded to the new bracket. I called Johnny and he said that's normal and to just put a nylon locknut on the end of the bolt and tighten it down. I just installed mine about a month ago.

Not a big deal, seems to work just fine, but hopefully I can save some people a little confusion lol

(Oh, and the nut should be M8 x 1.25 IIRC)
 
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