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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This car has 169K miles showing and 12K miles on a rebuilt A604 tranny. Yesterday I did a pan drop and drained 5 quarts of whatever was in it (it looked good and pink with no burnt oder) and replenished it with 5 quarts of ATF-4 with a new filter and rubber pan gasket. Previous owner didn't have a clue what the rebuild shop put into it for fluid so I decided to at least do a pan drop. I drove it to the DMV today (20 miles) and it shifted fine. I then noticed when I got home that there was a faint racheting noise after shifting from park into either forward or reverse gears. Very faint racheing and then it engages gear and shifts fine while driving. What could this faint racheting be? Needing a cable adjustment? All ideas appreciated! Thanks!
 

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There is a TSB related to the "Ratchet Sound" for A604 Trans.

NO: 21-10-96
SUBJECT: Ratcheting Sound During Garage Shifts and When Coming to A Stop
DATE: Jul. 5, 1996
SYMPTOM/CONDITION:
A "ratcheting" or clicking sound is heard during garage shifts or when the vehicle is coming to a stop. This sound is normal and is associated with the operation of the transaxle shift solenoid. On some vehicles this sound may be more noticeable than others because of variations in sealing of the solenoid sound shield. THE TRANSAXLE SHIFT SOLENOID SHOULD NOT BE REPLACED FOR THIS CONDITION.

DIAGNOSIS:
With the vehicle operator present, confirm the sound is associated with the transaxle shift solenoid operation by firmly applying the brakes then, while the engine is running, shift the vehicle into gear. If the ratcheting sound is confirmed, perform the Repair Procedure.

PARTS REQUIRED:
Quantity
Part No.
Description

AR

82300234
Sealant, Mopar RTV



REPAIR PROCEDURE:
This bulletin involves sealing ALL air gaps between the solenoid sound shield and the transaxle case.

NOTE: THIS REPAIR PROCEDURE WILL NOT ELIMINATE THE RATCHETING SOUND BUT WILL REDUCE IT AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE. THE RATCHETING SOUND IS A NORMAL CHARACTERISTIC OF THIS TRANSAXLE AND IN NO WAY EFFECTS THE RELIABILITY OR DURABILITY OF THE TRANSAXLE.

Clean the area where the solenoid sound shield meets with the transaxle case with steam or other appropriate cleaner. Raising the vehicle on an appropriate hoist and/or removing the air cleaner may be helpful in gaining access to the area.
NOTE: DO NOT use petroleum based cleaners because they may deteriorate the sound shield and/or the electrical connectors/components.

Blow the area dry with compressed air.
Use Mopar RTV sealant (P/N 82300234) to seal ALL air gaps between the solenoid sound shield and the transaxle case.
Lower the vehicle and install the air cleaner if applicable.
POLICY:
Reimbursable within the provisions of the warranty.

TIME ALLOWANCE:
Labor Operation No.
Time

21-90-95-90
0.3 Hrs.



FAILURE CODE:
Code
Description

XX

Service Adjustment
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The only reason I was alarmed by this "noise" is that it sounded like the transmission in my '84 T-1 Lebaron ragtop when it went out. After it quit it would make a racheting sound when put in either reverse or drive with the engine idling. Thanks for the excellent explanation of this. I am tackling a valve cover gasket(s) replacement on the 3.0 V6 tomorrow so at least I won't have the transmission noise in the back of my mind. One more question about the cold start puff of blue smoke out of the exhaust pipe. Will LUCAS oil stabilizer help out valve seals/guides that are not completely worn out? Normally I shy away from these fix all products but I've read good reviews of this oil additive. Thanks all!
 

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I have never tried an additive for that purpose so I do not know.
Valve seals either get hard, crack or wear out at the stem if there is some guide wear.
I really do not believe in oil additives even though a lot of people use them and swear by them. Regardless of what the bottle says you have to be careful as the additive may not be compatible with the additive packages in the oil, that is why Chrysler does not recommend oil additives in thier vehicles.
 

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i have also seen the valve guides physically drop down out of the heads. dont waste your time with a valve job, unless you are doing the rings. the rings get sticky it the piston grooves and dont hold tension on the cylinder wall. seen alot of this.
 

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I have never tried an additive for that purpose so I do not know.
Valve seals either get hard, crack or wear out at the stem if there is some guide wear.
I really do not believe in oil additives even though a lot of people use them and swear by them. Regardless of what the bottle says you have to be careful as the additive may not be compatible with the additive packages in the oil, that is why Chrysler does not recommend oil additives in thier vehicles.
doesn't chrysler still peddle the BG products?. i thought they used to. maybe they wised up. wink wink.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I use the house brand 5w30 from Walmart. Nothing fancy. No synthetic or semi-synthetics here. I've used Marvel Mystery Oil also. I thought with the car sitting unused like it did maybe something dried out and Lucas might get it pliable again. The car only puffs a little blue smoke on a cold start. No smoke screen or clouds of blue haze.:thumb:
 

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We use BG fuel injection cleaner but the Chrysler kit does not involve an oil additive, it is injector cleaner(to run straight thru the fuel rail) additive for the tank and throttle body cleaner.
The only oil additive Chrysler and GM (we used to Olds also) is EOS (engine oil supplement) and that is to help with breakin on a new engine only.
Here is info straight from Chrysler

ENGINE OIL - GASOLINE ENGINES
WARNING: New or used engine oil can be irritating to the skin. Avoid prolonged or repeated skin contact with engine oil. Contaminants in used engine oil, caused by internal combustion, can be hazardous to your health. Thoroughly wash exposed skin with soap and water. Do not wash skin with gasoline, diesel fuel, thinner, or solvents, health problems can result. Do not pollute, dispose of used engine oil properly. Contact your dealer or government agency for location of collection center in your area.

When service is required, DaimlerChrysler Corporation recommends that only Mopar® brand parts, lubricants and chemicals be used. Mopar® provides the best engineered products for servicing DaimlerChrysler Corporation vehicles.

Only lubricants bearing designations defined by the following organization should be used.

Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
American Petroleum Institute (API)
National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI)
Association des Constructeurs Européens d' Automobiles (European Automobile Manufacturers Association) (ACEA)
API SERVICE GRADE CERTIFIED
Use an engine oil that is API Certified. MOPAR® provides engine oils, that meet or exceed this requirement.

SAE VISCOSITY




An SAE viscosity grade is used to specify the viscosity of engine oil. Use only engine oils with multiple viscosities such as 5W-30 or 10W-30. These are specified with a dual SAE viscosity grade which indicates the cold-to-hot temperature viscosity range. For 3.7L/4.7L engines SAE 5W-30 engine oil is recommended for all operating temperatures. For 5.7L engines, SAE 5W-20 engine oil is recommended for all operating temperatures. Vehicles with 5.7L engines equipped with Multiple Displacement System, (MDS), must use SAE 5W-20 oil. Failure to do so may result in improper operation of the Multiple Displacement System (MDS).These engine oils improve low temperature starting and vehicle fuel economy. Refer to your engine oil filler cap for the recommended engine oil viscosity for your vehicle.


ACEA Categories
For countries that use the ACEA European Oil Categories for Service Fill Oils, use engine oils that meet the requirements of ACEA A1/B1, A2/B2, or A3/B3.

ENERGY CONSERVING OIL
An Energy Conserving type oil is recommended for gasoline engines. The designation of ENERGY CONSERVING is located on the label of an engine oil container.

CONTAINER IDENTIFICATION




Standard engine oil identification notations have been adopted to aid in the proper selection of engine oil. The identifying notations are located on the front label of engine oil plastic bottles and the top of engine oil cans.

This symbol means that the oil has been certified by the American Petroleum Institute (API). DiamlerChrysler only recommends API Certified engine oils. Use Mopar® engine oil or equivalent.


SYNTHETIC ENGINE OILS
There are a number of engine oils being promoted as either synthetic or semi-synthetic. If you chose to use such a product, use only those oils that meet the American Petroleum Institute (API) and SAE viscosity standard. Follow the service schedule that describes your driving type.


ENGINE OIL ADDITIVES/SUPPLEMENTS
The manufacturer does not recommend the addition of any engine oil additives/supplements to the specified engine oil. Engine oil additives/supplements should not be used to enhance engine oil performance. Engine oil additives/supplements should not be used to extend engine oil change intervals. No additive is known to be safe for engine durability and can degrade emission components. Additives can contain undesirable materials that harm the long term durability of engines by:

Doubling the level of phosphorus in the engine oil. The ILSAC (International Lubricant Standard Approval Committee) GF-2 and GF-3 standards require that engine oil contain no more than 0.10% phosphorus to protect the vehicles emissions performance. Addition of engine oil additives/supplements can poison, from the added sulfur and phosphorus, catalysts and hinder efforts to guarantee emissions performance to 80,000 miles.
Altering the viscosity characteristics of the engine oil so that it no longer meets the requirements of the specified viscosity grade.
Creating potential for an undesirable additive compatibility interaction in the engine crankcase. Generally it is not desirable to mix additive packages from different suppliers in the crankcase; there have been reports of low temperature engine failures caused by additive package incompatibility with such mixtures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
go a bit heavier on the weight. like at least 10w30 5/30 is piss thin and gets past the valves easier. it most likley leaks down into the combustion chambers overnight, and at your first start burns off.
Thats what I was thinking. Next oil change I'll use 10w30 or 10w40 for the Summer months here. We get many stretches in the 100F's and it seems like everyone and their Grandma gets out and bumper to bumper sometimes is the norm. Thank you all!
 

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The older 3.0L's had a TSB about putting snap rings on the valve guides. It solved the smoke issues. My Duster is too new to have had that problem, so I don't have the part # for the kit. I'm not sure, but there may have been a special tool or two involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The older 3.0L's had a TSB about putting snap rings on the valve guides. It solved the smoke issues. My Duster is too new to have had that problem, so I don't have the part # for the kit. I'm not sure, but there may have been a special tool or two involved.

This is a '94 V6. I thought the valve related smoke issue was taken care of in the late 1991 production year???
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Th smoking issue seems to be a premature concern on this car. With about 75-100 miles on the car, driven since sitting for 2-3 months, I'm seeing less and less blue oil puffs on cold start ups and none after getting to operating temperature. Only thing I have added to the car other than new 5w30 engine oil and new ATF-4 fluid is about 12oz of Marvel Mystery Oil to a tankful of unleaded gas. My wife is infatuated with the way my $350 car handles and performs. But then, after her driving her 10mpg '95 E150 conversion van for the last 216K miles, I'd think anything would be impressive! Now if I can find a replacement Camel colored leather buckets/rearseats for it and get the upper hinge at the body welded and fix the sagging driverside door.......
 

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they say it was fixed in 91 or 92 but I think thats bull. I have a smoking 94 I will bet have the guides dropping. My brother use to work in a repair shop that did alot of engine work and has had many 3.0 heads off and he told me from 92 to 94 were hit and miss for the fix. After 94 it is fixed. If the guides have dropped it drops the oil right into the exhaust so it won't foul your plugs. If your plugs are fouling look for something else. Also search around here for other threads I know one NAJ posted mopar info in it.
Tim
 

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Be sure to not overtighten the VC's when you replace the gaskets & lube the cam seals before you put them in, or use RTV on them.

I have a '94 with 145k on the clock, it wasn't hardly maintained before I got it, and no smoke at all.
 
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