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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The rubber hose part of the high pressure A/C line started bubbling refrigerant/liquid out of the pores of the hose itself - never seen that before! Does anyone know the part numbers for a 1984 LeBaron Turbo high pressure A/C line? I'll take the low pressure line part number as well if you happen to know it. Might try to replace both while I'm at it.

I'm also aware that some shops can replace the rubber part of the line, but would like to start with part numbers if possible.

Thanks!
 

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I have heard but cannot confirm the 134 molecules are smaller than R12 molecules which could cause the gas.to escape out through the hoses.
 

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The suction hose is Mopar p/n 3848699. If you want OE, get out your wallet:


Discharge hose is p/n 3848736...a comparative bargain at $179.99:


The above hoses are NOS, so they're made for R-12. There is some merit to what GLHS0815 stated...that's why the newer hoses are "barrier" type. That said, I've used old R-12 hoses for some of my (many) R-134 conversions with no ill effects (yet!).

It will likely be much more cost-effective to have your hoses rebuilt with barrier hose. I had a guy in Tucson rebuild my Daytona hoses for $100-$150. They're great.

If you are adventurous, you can use similar hoses if you have the typical A590 compressor like this:

276752


The hose mount patterns/spacing to the compressor, condenser, receiver-drier, and evaporator plate/expansion valve are all pretty much the same.

This summer I reconditioned the A/C in my '85 K-car wagon, 2.2L EFI. The hoses were also obsolete and expensive. Found an OEM equivalent and an aftermarket hose to do the job. One thing to remember on the 1984-85 models is the fact they use a temperature sensing switch on the suction hose, which has a brass (or copper) probe that slides into a well on that hose. You'll need a hose with that well (and lots of heat sink paste to fill the well). That switch is about 30 bucks and is still available:

276753


Here's my setup on the '85. Works like a champ...42 degrees at the dash vents.

276755



I paid about 50 bones each for the hoses; the receiver-drier is cheap as chips. I cleaned and re-used the OE condenser.

You may notice I have some zip-ties here & there. These hoses are not exactly OE, so had to tidy up the routing a bit. All works fine, though. Better than fine actually.

This is my experience, so it all depends on how much you want to tinker with this. I've done a dozen conversions with good results.

NOTE if you have dealer-installed A/C (which often used a Sanden compressor), all bets are off. Cheers.
 

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EDIT

Was a bit tired I guess. The hose part numbers on my picture are reversed. Suction is AC5113 and discharge is the Four Seasons 55502.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is very helpful, thank you all for responding. I converted to R134 years ago and never had a problem either until this Woodward Dream Cruise. Pulled off Woodward and immediately could see the refrigerant/oil bubbling out of pinholes in the rubber line. As far as I know, everything A/C on the car is OE and from the factory, not dealer-installed.

I see the Four Seasons 55502 on RockAuto. Nice!
 

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Very cool. Be advised on the Four Seasons parts, as they will sometimes differ. The one in the pic is USA made (Dayco), but I have gotten one or two from China (ugh). In addition, some use the HNBR (green) O-rings, and some use the OE-style aluminum "N" gaskets. I prefer the latter, but the O-rings work OK as long as you lube them and torque to only about 170 inch-pounds. Good luck finding them. Check eBay for the AC5113 if you want that.
 
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