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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
Paint

By the end of summer, 2014, I had completed the underside and interior metal repairs. As I mentioned before, my plan was to do a spray can paint job, because the car was mostly to be used for track days. By this time, it was looking so good that I couldn't bring myself to put a crappy paint job on it.

While we were at the Watkins Glen vintage races, I spotted my favorite race car, a GT40 that was painted in the Gulf racing colors.


After my wife took my picture, I told her that I wished I could have my car painted in those colors. Her reply was, "Why can't you?" Of course that was all it took to get my mind working. Yes, it would cost more money to redo what I had painted, but that really wasn't much of the car. The body still hadn't been painted, so it wouldn't cost much more than having it painted red.

I started scouring the internet for Porsche 924 & 944's, to see what schemes they had come up with. This is the one that I really liked.




If you remember, the Daytona was developed to compete with the Porsche 944's, and they look very similar. Besides, I think it might be fun to see how many people would mistake it for a Porsche, and never suspect it was a Daytona. Our cars never get any respect.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
One of the problems with buying a northern car, with body panels, is that you can't really tell what lies behind them. When I bought the car, this is what I saw.


After pulling the side panel, this is what I found.


Once I started poking away, it ended up looking like this.




Before patching, I sprayed Eastwood's internal frame coating/sealant. It is designed to get into areas that can't be accessed, and seal the rust.
Eastwood Internal Frame Coating 14oz Aerosol

I patched on a section of new rocker panel. Keep in mind that I was still learning how to weld, and not worried about how pretty this section would look, because it would be covered by the body panels.




Before:


After:


I also had to fix the passenger rear fender, above the wheel, where it was damaged. It also turned out to be rusted from underneath. I guess that I never took pics of the patch job, so you can't see how bad it was.


Before sending it off for paint and bodywork, I put the original suspension back on, and locked it in full extension, to allow better access, for painting.


I cobbled up a solid front strut.



At this point, in early 2015, I had the entire car stripped of body panels, wiring, and any removable parts, so it was off to the paint shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
In January, I dropped the car off at my painter's. He warned me that he probably wouldn't get to it for a while, but I wasn't in any rush.







Mid-summer, I was at the Syracuse Nationals and came across a vendor who sells sound proofing and thermal barrier spray coatings. Of course, my painter had already done the interior, and the spray coatings required that it be sanded, before they could be applied. Then, the paint could be put back on. My painter was really happy to hear that.







In November, he called to say it was time to pick it up. The plan was to paint everything so that none of the old color showed.








He will paint the inside of the various panels, that need to be bolted on. After I get them all onto the car, he will paint the outside again. We decided to use a one step urethane, so that touchups will be easier to do.

Since then, it has been on the trailer, waiting for me to finish the Laser. Hopefully, the Laser will be done this week, and I can finally get started.
 

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If you intend the car to be for track days, why bother putting the spare tire well back in? I am seriously contemplating removing mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
If you intend the car to be for track days, why bother putting the spare tire well back in? I am seriously contemplating removing mine.
I pondered that when I was starting the project, but decided that, since I also intend to drive it on the roads, I will need a spare tire. If I ever decide to go with a fuel cell, then I will get rid of the tire well.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I'm also working on fitting my Eastwood TriFlow radiator in place. I bought the Ford/Chrysler 19x26", which is 2" higher than the original Laser radiator.
Tri-Flow Radiators - NO MORE OVERHEATING!

Being a track day car, I plan to only use water, for coolant, so the thicker core, and the tri-flow design, should really help keep the coolant temp under control.


I plan to run a reverse coolant setup. Since I can't raise the radiator, I'll have to lower it. This requires setting it closer to the engine. The down side is that I will have to redesign the front motor mount.

I had to cut away the lower radiator mounts.


This won't leave much room for the front motor mount, but I'm sure I can come up with something.


Since I plan to keep the AC condenser, I'll have to add shrouding.






The key reference starts at the radiator cap.


This area will need to be opened up for the intercooler piping.


 

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Why only water doesn't it boil quicker than coolant, just curious and there's the rust to contend with. Regards. Errol.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Why only water doesn't it boil quicker than coolant, just curious and there's the rust to contend with. Regards. Errol.
Most tracks don't like anti-freeze because it's hard to clean up. I guess drag strips are the same way.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Since I have so many aluminum parts, that require welding, I have decided to invest in a TIG welder. Previously, I have had to take parts to various welders, only to get them back oriented differently than I wanted, or wait a couple weeks.

I found this TIG welder on Eastwood's site:
Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC Welder

It had good reviews, works off both 120 and 240v, and was priced at $700. I was able to learn how to MIG weld, from YouTube. Hopefully, I can learn to TIG weld.
 

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How difficult can it be, the things I've seen u do, wish I must say are quite amazing using the tig is a piece a cake. I learned on a mig welder and I can say that my welds have improved the more I use the machine, before I bought the machine one welder told me just practice it'll come, so my friend fear not it will come. Regards .Errol
 

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Discussion Starter #39
As I stated before, once I started learning how to weld, my grinding skills really improved.

I do wish that I knew then, what I know now. I have so many burn scars, that could have been avoided.
 
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