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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Daytona has roughly 240k miles on it and still has the original clutch in it. It's lasted a loooooong time but it finally has started to show its age. It started to slip under full throttle in 5th gear, and over the past year has worsened to not consistently holding full power in 2nd. It still copes fine with 80 mph cruising on the highway, so I'm not entirely sure when the thing will finally give up. But before then I really want to make sure I have all the parts I need ordered or on hand so I'm prepared to replace it.

As for the repair process, I've heard the easiest way is to lift the front end, drop the subframe, and use a hoist or trans jack to help drop the thing out of the car. I've heard it's possible without taking out the subframe, but it's not much more work after pulling the axles and it'll make a ton more room. As far as I know, only the shift cables, clutch cable, axles, speed sensor connector and reverse light switch connector need to be removed. Is there anything else I need to be aware of?

On top of the clutch going out, I suspect the transmission input shaft bearing is bad. There's a chattering bearing that stops making noise when I press in the clutch at a standstill (couldn't hear it at speed to compare being in gear or neutral) and if I shut the car off after just pushing in the clutch, I can easily hear the input shaft grinding to a halt from what I assume is that bearing. Is that bearing externally accessible or would I have to pull the gears out to get it?

On the subject of actual parts, I want to replace everything I possibly can while I have the car apart. I plan on doing the clutch disc (obviously), flywheel, pressure plate, pilot bearing, release bearing, the leaky rear main seal, and the trans input bearing if I can. Does anyone have specific recommendations for any/all of these parts? I'm completely fine with paying a little extra if it means getting something good that will last a long time. Something that might factor into what parts I'm looking for is my driving style and how I use the car. The car is stock and gets used as a daily so a stage 4 clutch is a horrible idea, but I do take the thing out for spirited driving sometimes so I would consider taking a bit of weight off the flywheel and getting a clutch with a little bit more bite than stock. And lastly, should I replace the clutch fork grommet and clip? I haven't looked at it because there hasn't been an issue (yet) but saw a polyurethane one on PolyBushings.com and started to wonder if I should go ahead and swap that out while I'm in there.

Last thing I need to ask is kinda dumb, but what's the best way to clean the loose dust off the clutch disc and coat it with something clear? I want to hang it on my wall as a decoration without the risk of airborne asbestos.
 

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I cannot answer all of your questions, however...
1)The noise you hear with the clutch pedal released that goes away when you depress the clutch is Normal.
I have had that same noise (as have others on this site) since my car was new.
I took it back to the dealer and they told me it was normal (I knew all of these guys from racing).
When I replaced the clutch at 39,000 miles (Wore it out racing) I cleaned and lubed all mounting points for the release bearing and clutch fork and the noise stopped, when I told my buddies they all said" it will be back" and they were right.
I now have 186,000 miles on the car and that noise has been present for 32 years.
2)How old is your clutch cable, they are a high failure rate and if it is OE it is long overdue for replacement.
In 32 years I replaced mine about 6 times (I was replacing every 4 years to attempt to avoid failure on the road), 3 times the cable actually broke, two of those times I needed a tow and the other happened in my driveway.
Mileage is not the issue, it is all related to how many times you are on/off the clutch.
Yes, you should have a spare grommet and retainer, the cables break right at the ball where it goes through the clutch fork and the grommet and retainer fall to the ground.
The Mopar # is 4641146 (that number may have been superseded) measure the length to be sure any aftermarket listings are correct
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3)Replace the plastic snap grommets in the shifter cables with Poly Bushings, this is also a common problem just like the clutch cable, I was also replacing the shifter cables every 4 years due to this three times I had the snap grommets break while driving, twice it was on the Selector Cable which is attached to the side of the transaxle so the cable dropped off and I had to drive home in whatever gear the trans was in when the cable broke. The third time was with the Crossover cable which is on top so the cable stayed in place and I was able to shift although the shifter was very sloppy.
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4)Be sure to use the proper lubricant when you refill the trans, 5W-30 conventional engine oil.
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5)Clutch Removal and Components
Our cars do not use a Pilot Bearing.
The OE clutch/pressure plate was manufactured by Sachs for the turbo cars and the 3.0L, LUK also manufactured clutches for Mopar for the TBI cars.
With the amount of HP/Torque of a 3.0L you should be fine with OE aftermarket clutch parts.
When I replaced my clutch at 39,000 miles (1994) I used a Mopar replacement. I currently have 147,000 miles on that clutch and my car is my daily driver and has been since 1997, my 90 Daytona 2.2L VNT is 174 HP @5200 RPM's and 210 Lb.- Ft. of torque @ 3400 RPM's, the 3.0L is only 141 HP @ 5000 RPM's and 171 Lb. - Ft. of torque.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just reviewed my car's service log book and the clutch cable and clutch haven't been touched since the records started in 1991 at <19k miles. The shifter cables were replaced a couple times before I got the car and I did the bushings twice, and I already have the polyurethane replacements on the way to fix the slop from the crappy rubber bushings. I'll grab the LUK clutch kit and flywheel from RockAuto, and maybe a new cable (which brand is a better option, ATP or Pioneer?). The cable end looks fine, but the braiding looks a little tired on the top end of the release lever. It definitely needs a new grommet though...
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Also is this the self adjusting mechanism of the clutch in the back of the pedal? I tried to get a picture of the other end of the cable but I couldn't see it with my eyes or camera.
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Yes the plastic piece with the spring attached is the self adjuster mechanism.

As far as which aftermarket clutch cable is better, I actually do not know, I have only used Mopar cables, I was a Chrysler Service Tech for 15 years and got parts at 10% over cost so I stocked up on Clutch Cables and Shifter Cables amongst other things, I only have one clutch cable left.
Other folks on the site have used aftermarket cables and I have not heard of any complaints. My suggestion would be to order one of each and examine and compare them, maybe even keep both, just in case or at least until you are sure you do not have any issues with the one you use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Where can I find new flywheel and pressure plate bolts? Can't find any sets or dimensions anywhere, and searching this site only told me that ARP used to make a set of flywheel bolts (double checked anyways) and that the flexplates are mounted with shorter bolts.
 
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