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R.I.P Dennis Jarvis
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Air Cleaner Housing - Oil Leaking From The Housing




Models

1988 E-, G-, H-, J-, K-, & P-Body Vehicles With Turbo I and Turbo II Engines

Subject

Oil in Air Cleaner

Index

DRIVEABILITY

Date

January 30, 1989

No.

18-02-89

P-261 (C18-02-9)

BODY CODE LEGEND

E - New Yorker Turbo/600/Caravelle
G - Daytona
H - Lancer/LeBaron GTS
K - LeBaron (4-door)
J - LeBaron
P - Shadow/Sundance

SYMPTOM/CONDITION

Engine oil leaking out the bottom of the air cleaner housing.

DIAGNOSIS

Remove the air cleaner element and check for oil saturation of element, as well as breather element. If saturation is present, process with repair.

PARTS REQUIRED

1 Crankcase Vent Nipple PN 4387304
1 Silicone Rubber Adhesive Sealant PN 4318025
1 Loctite Stud N' Bearing Mount PN 4318032
1 Air Cleaner Element PN 4342801
1 Breather Element PN 4306914
REPAIR PROCEDURE

1. Remove the cylinder head cover using the procedures in the service manual.

2. Remove the baffle plate by first removing two bolts from the back of the cylinder head cover. Pry baffle from the cylinder head cover.

NOTE: THE SILICONE RUBBER ADHERES WELL, REQUIRING SOME FORCE TO SEPARATE THE BAFFLE PLATE FROM THE COVER.

3. Remove the crankcase vent nipple by twisting nipple to free, then pull out. Vice grips can be used for this operation.

4. Clean all old sealant off the baffle plate and cylinder head cover.

FIGURE 1 5. Apply silicone rubber adhesive sealant on the baffle plate and cylinder head cover as indicated (Figure 1).
6. Install new crankshaft vent nipple. Seal with Loctite Stud N' Bearing mount, and press into cylinder head cover taking care not to damage the nipple.

FIGURE 2 7. Remove the crankcase vent to air cleaner tube assembly, PCV valve and intake manifold hose assembly (Figure 2). Remove the air cleaner and breather elements and discard. Clean any oil from the air cleaner housing and PCV system. Install new filter and breather elements in the air cleaner.
8. Reinstall valve cover on engine using procedure in the service manual. Allow two to three hours for the RTV to cure before starting the engine.

9. Reinstall clean PCV system.
 

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R.I.P Dennis Jarvis
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R.I.P Dennis Jarvis
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All this info would be great if I have a oiling leak at the valve cover PCV nipple,but I have other issues of where my 88' Shelby Z car igintion will shut down while driving & will not start up again till after 30 min.or more has gone by. More recently the car might start & then it might not at all & I been heading in the direction of my fuel injectors, fuel pump or SEMC modual that controls voltage to all 3 ? Maybe, the distribitor Hep system unit at fault ? After I leave here I will go to search & try to find a thread or post about this kind of automotive Nightmare !
 

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Not sure how you got on this tread "Air Cleaner Housing - Oil Leaking From The Housing" if your car is shutting down & stalling.

I have a 87 Shelby Z that would hiccup when driving at speed 25-70 MPH and would stall while sitting at stop light. I replace my HEP under the distributer cap and it resolved the stalling issue. The HEP deteriorates over time and when it gets hot will not work properly. If you let is sit and cool down it will restart and run till it gets hot again. This is more of a symptom of a bad HEP which will eventually crater and not start at all. Buy original MOPAR if possible since the aftermarket parts don't seem to last as long as genuine MOPAR part.

Ron
 

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By the way. You do not need to replace the nipple unless you have one that has a sweeping curve in it. Here is a pic showing a nipple that does need replaced.



Dennis
You do not replace that 90 degree nipple with a straight one. The 90 degree nipple is for T1 suckthrough cars. The straight nipple is for T1 blowthrough, T2, T4 cars. Match the metal nipple for what model engine you have.
 

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I read through the whole thread. We use this car for road course racing.
I have an 88 Shelby Z T2, oil leaking on top of the trans. The crankcase vent hose elbow is missing that is attached onto the side of the air filter box. I have re sealed the baffle in the valve cover, the pcv valve appears to be functioning fine.
When the car is boosting and you have your foot into it for long periods of time, oil starts leaking out of the crankcase tube. The car now has 146,000 miles on it.
We thought the rings were starting to go, ran like a new car, did not BURN any oil!
All kinds of power, all factory set up. Factory boost levels, factory parts.
I had the motor completely gone through at a reputable machine shop. It still leaks oil just like it did before.
Any suggestions/help would be great.
I was thinking of going with the cast valve cover?
Thank you
Jeff
 

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Eliminate the PCV system entirely and let the Engine breathe to the atmosphere.

The TBI valve cover with 2 nipples is best as you can run 2 hoses.

Don't try and contain crank case pressure as it can not be contained.

The easier it is for the crank case to breathe, the less oil that exits the Engine.

I run heater a length hose off each nipple with no restriction.

Any restriction can have a venturi effect and restricted crank case pressure tends to suck oil.

Sounds like a cool car !! Have you posted any pictures??

Thanks
Randy

RIP CBMDennis
 

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If he eliminates the PVC system entirely he will eliminate his ability to pass a smog check. The PVC system on our cars as designed cant allow the crankcase to build pressure as there is a vent that goes down to the air box ( the elbow you speak of) that tube is the diameter of your finger and goes to open air through a small filter in the air filter box so there is no possible way for the system to pressurize under boost even with a clogged PCV valve.

i am running the exact same valve cover you are on my engine with the stock style PVC setup. i did the TSB repair above when i assembled this engine and have not had so much as a drop of oil come out of that tube in 2 years. you have something else going on assuming you have a fresh pcv valve in there and have done the TSB repair correctly.
 

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Do you suppose he has to pass smog on a road race car??

Chrysler 2.2/2.5 Turbo PCV system is very inadequate when boosting for long periods of time, even short periods in most cases.

Thanks
Randy
 

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I agree with you, the TBI valve cover would be a big help. Once we find one and install it, I was going to try connecting the one nipple to the pcv valve.
Then connect the other to the air filter box, and see what happens.
The pcv valve is a new Chrysler factory part, seals under boost, sucks under vac.


I will put pictures up soon.
Thank you
Jeff
 

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The pcv valve is a new Chrysler factory part, seals under boost, sucks under vac.
I found them leak under boost, even when brand new. Try it, blow some air to it.


I like the 12204-46020 valves from Toyota dealer. All metal, no leak, and I have one for 5 years.








Though, if I road race my car, I'd probably use an oil catch can and just leave it venting to atmosphere.
 

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I was seriously looking at adding a catch can set up. When the car is under boost for as long as it is on each lap this is when it starts to leak out. It leaks to the point where every time we pit we need to pour a quart in it! So we would need a catch can that can be Y'd into the turbo oil return line to dump it back in the pan. We are going to try the valve cover swap first. Many have stated success with going this route. I am also going to add the Toyota pcv valve you suggested (funny I have to go to the Toyota dealer for another matter tomorrow, I will already be there). There have been a bunch of posts stating the factory valve does not seal all the way.
Then catch can as a last resort.
Otherwise, I am running out of hair on my head to pull out.
Thanks
Jeff
 

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There is no up side to running a PCV, it allows octane reducing oil vapors to enter the Engine air intake.

Any oil found anywhere in the intake, T.B. Intercooler, etc, enters through the PCV.

Atmosphere venting will have the least amount of oil exiting the Engine and is free .

Thanks
Randy
 

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Update: 88 Daytona Shelby Z
Oil in air cleaner housing.
We raced the car this past weekend, had a lot of fun.
At the same time oil started to leak/pour out on top of the transmission from the drain hole in the air cleaner box. This continued all weekend long.

Before the rebuild the engine had 146,000 on it, it went like a bad out of hell (it was loose). After it has less power, probably because its tight (only 75 break in miles before race) its hard to drive a race car on the street and not get caught. we changed to the cast VC with dual breather nipples, also Toyota PCV valve, this did help.
This car on the track is probably boosting 3/4 of the time every lap, I understand it was not designed to do this. There has to be a way to stop it!

I do not remember seeing this on any turbo 1 motors?
We are running factory boost pressure, turbo, intake everything!
Any ideas??????
Thank you
Jeff
 

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I always delete the PCV valve/system in all 8 V Turbo Dodge's.

Nothing to gain, Engine to lose.

Allow both nipples to breathe freely to the atmosphere, unrestricted.

Thanks
Randy
 
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