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I have an aluminium flywheel and before using it, I would like to understand the benefits and the drawbacks.

From Fidanza site, with my questions :

•Faster throttle response and quicker acceleration
This I can understand as the rotational mass is reduced, there is less inertia
But is it perceptible ?
The weight is here for something, I mean that reducing the inertia may be useful in some situations (when going from neutral to first ?)
This is precicely what I would like to know : what are the drawbacks using an aluminium flywheel ?

•Additional horsepower to the wheels (reduced parasitic losses)
Is this only theory (it seems so) ?

•Smoother, faster shifting
Theory ?
Difference between manual and auto (less problem with auto at low speed ?)

•Easier braking, better slowing (due to reduced rotational mass)
Theory ?

•Reduced clutch wear and improved efficiency (from better heat dissipation)
Theory ?

•Cost savings and longevity (replaceable friction plate = infinitely re-buildable design)
How long (miles) an aluminium flywheel can last (mine is not rebuildable) ?
 

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I have an aluminium flywheel and before using it, I would like to understand the benefits and the drawbacks.

From Fidanza site, with my questions :

•Faster throttle response and quicker acceleration
This I can understand as the rotational mass is reduced, there is less inertia
But is it perceptible ?
Yes

The weight is here for something, I mean that reducing the inertia may be useful in some situations (when going from neutral to first ?)
This is precicely what I would like to know : what are the drawbacks using an aluminium flywheel ?
have to slip the clutch a little more to get started.

•Additional horsepower to the wheels (reduced parasitic losses)
Is this only theory (it seems so) ?
taking 5-10lbs of engine speed rotational mass away does increase HP to the wheels.


•Smoother, faster shifting
Theory ?
Difference between manual and auto (less problem with auto at low speed ?)
shifting speed seems the same to me.



•Easier braking, better slowing (due to reduced rotational mass)
Theory ?
never noticed my braking was easier.. that doesnt make sense.

•Reduced clutch wear and improved efficiency (from better heat dissipation)
Theory ?
I noticed no change in clutch wear.

•Cost savings and longevity (replaceable friction plate = infinitely re-buildable design)
How long (miles) an aluminium flywheel can last (mine is not rebuildable) ?
most flywheels can be turned at least once. the friction area is still the same material. would have no change in longevity to me as the parts that wear are identical.
 

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I put a Fidanza aluminum flywheel (with a Mitsu clutch) in my Sebring 3L coupe. I get quicker acceleration in the low gears for sure. Seems my mpg is less but that could be from something else or just me liking to "get up and go". My mechanic thinks I drive like an old man (well maybe I am but that's beside the point) because I put 186,000 miles on the original clutch. I took it easy the first 300 miles to break it in right so I won't have those dang rattling springs like the original.
Just my 2 cents...
 

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I had a 2.5L with a stock cylinder head and garrett turbo at the time.

I noticed zero difference in power/torque
I noticed zero difference in high quickly it rev, but it may havc to do with the nature of a stock 2.5L
I noticed taking off from a stop is a lot harder and I can't adjust to what the flywheel wants.

I was pretty disappointed spending $250 for it after noticed no gain and made the car more difficult to drive, so I sold it.
 

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I dropped an aluminum flywheel on my 2.5 Daytona along with a Spec Stage 3 clutch. I took it very easy with no slipping to start and smooth easy shifts for the first 1000 miles to break it in. Though I don't slip the clutch in normal or fast conditions anyway. So for me just basically not beating on the car for 1000 miles. Based on people saying you needed to slip the clutch more and needed more revs to launch my 1st chance to race I raised my launch rpms by 1000 from 3grand to 4grand. Big mistake. 1st gear was a smoke show from the tires before I could get it to hook while shifting to 2nd. Figured out 2500rpms with the aluminum flywheel. So 500 less rpms to launch the car.

With the aluminum flywheel, and UDP the starter kicks the car over like a machine gun instead of the slow cranking it did stock.

Yes the throttle response is much improved. I had to adjust how much gas I gave it when starting and when downshifting to match revs. I.E. Less gas

You might not notice any quicker shifting because these cars open up the AIS motor as soon as you either hit the gas, or start moving. That's why the revs hang. I eliminated my AIS and the revs fall instantly. So you have to increase the speed at which you shift normally to make a smooth shift or when you release the clutch you're bring the revs back up instead of bringing them down. This applies when you're shifting fast as well as the clutch isn't working as hard to bring the revs down between shifts. Case in point, my daughters Caliber SRT4 and it's electronic throttle body is so slow I get a 500rpm spike in between each shift when I'm driving it hard. So an aluminum flywheel will help to change the engine speeds on shifts making it easier, but until you disable that stupid AIS motor you might not notice much here

The engine will slow faster or should if the AIS isn't open, Will it help you when you put the brakes on? Probably not.

As far as clutch wear that all depends on what clutch you have and how you drive it. I've seen people that have no business being behind the wheel of a manual car and then I've seen 6 puck clutches with 30k miles on them and not showing any wear even though it's been raced with.



Will I have a manual car without one? Only until the stocker gives up the ghost. Then in goes an aluminum flywheel and a puck clutch setup. I even convinced a friend to put one in his 89 Turbo woody caravan. It was a riot.


You will need to adjust your throttle inputs. Don't slip it. Learn to give it just enough gas to get rolling then let the clutch all the way out. Don't slip it when you downshift either. Learn to heel and toe so you can match revs on a downshift. If you don't have one with a replaceable friction surface then I'd say find one that does. It's cheap insurance.



I have an aluminium flywheel and before using it, I would like to understand the benefits and the drawbacks.

From Fidanza site, with my questions :

•Faster throttle response and quicker acceleration
This I can understand as the rotational mass is reduced, there is less inertia
But is it perceptible ?
The weight is here for something, I mean that reducing the inertia may be useful in some situations (when going from neutral to first ?)
This is precicely what I would like to know : what are the drawbacks using an aluminium flywheel ?

•Additional horsepower to the wheels (reduced parasitic losses)
Is this only theory (it seems so) ?

•Smoother, faster shifting
Theory ?
Difference between manual and auto (less problem with auto at low speed ?)

•Easier braking, better slowing (due to reduced rotational mass)
Theory ?

•Reduced clutch wear and improved efficiency (from better heat dissipation)
Theory ?

•Cost savings and longevity (replaceable friction plate = infinitely re-buildable design)
How long (miles) an aluminium flywheel can last (mine is not rebuildable) ?
 

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The wind up speed is before boost. Which I noticed faster turbo spool as the engine spun faster. I also noticed dampening, a smoother less vibration engine. I also combined my aluminum flywheel with an undrive pulley, oil hole and water pump housing porting. So a lot of parasitic losses kicked down. Another though is that you are supposed to have less friction with a harder pad of the aluminum flywheel insert. I like them though, no complaints
 
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