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That is a loaded question. There is much, much, more than bolting on a larger turbo into your SC and expecting it be fast, durable, and be fun to drive. Do a lot of research on these engines and find out what changed year to year. For example, the 85 Shelby Charger (with turbo) had beefier rods than the 86-88 T1. It also used a different cylinder head than the 86+ engines. The block itself is weaker in the 84-88 cars. The tranny being a a525, is far weaker than the later a520/555/523/568 manual transmissions. I'd be far more concerned about the tranny/clutch in your car, than the engine, as far as durability goes.

The turbo that is on your car is decent sized for a 2.2 liter engine. It can support efficiently around 250 HP before it becomes less efficient. Turbo's are a compromise, like other things in engines. Carburetors, injectors, and camshafts are other examples of bigger isn't always better. A larger turbo increases HP in upper RPM's, but losses HP in lower RPM's because it takes longer to spool the larger turbo. So for example your stock turbo can develop full boost around 2500 RPM, while a much larger turbo will only reach full boost until 5000 RPM or later. A stock 2.2 engine will rev to around 6000-6300 RPM before it loses efficiency. So by bolting on a much larger turbo, you've dramatically decreased the useable powerband by 2500 RPM! For a street car, you want a nice broad powerband, and not an engine that runs great in a 1000-1500 RPM powerband. That can work for a dragstrip only car, but you'd be very disappointed in that for a street car.

The stock turbo itself is capable of providing 25+lbs of boost. It won't be efficient doing it, but it can provide that much boost to your stock engine. The turbos ultimate boost is controlled by the engines computer and the turbo's wastegate actuator, not by the size of the turbo. Here is an example, I got my 85 GLHT into the upper 12's at the dragstrip 30+ years ago running a stock sized turbo. In other words, running about 20+ MPH and close to three seconds quicker ET's than a stock GLHT/SC without touching the turbo. My point is they're many other things to do to your car for better performance before you need to bolt on a bigger turbo. Bolting on a larger turbo alone will result in a car that is less fun to drive, and will probably be slower out at the dragstrip.

My suggestion is to read about these engines. Here is one website to look into if you haven't seen it already. Tons of great info about these cars and engines. Look under turbo database. That ought to keep you busy for a while (lol).
 

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That is a loaded question. There is much, much, more than bolting on a larger turbo into your SC and expecting it be fast, durable, and be fun to drive. Do a lot of research on these engines and find out what changed year to year. For example, the 85 Shelby Charger (with turbo) had beefier rods than the 86-88 T1. It also used a different cylinder head than the 86+ engines. The block itself is weaker in the 84-88 cars. The tranny being a a525, is far weaker than the later a520/555/523/568 manual transmissions. I'd be far more concerned about the tranny/clutch in your car, than the engine, as far as durability goes.

The turbo that is on your car is decent sized for a 2.2 liter engine. It can support efficiently around 250 HP before it becomes less efficient. Turbo's are a compromise, like other things in engines. Carburetors, injectors, and camshafts are other examples of bigger isn't always better. A larger turbo increases HP in upper RPM's, but losses HP in lower RPM's because it takes longer to spool the larger turbo. So for example your stock turbo can develop full boost around 2500 RPM, while a much larger turbo will only reach full boost until 5000 RPM or later. A stock 2.2 engine will rev to around 6000-6300 RPM before it loses efficiency. So by bolting on a much larger turbo, you've dramatically decreased the useable powerband by 2500 RPM! For a street car, you want a nice broad powerband, and not an engine that runs great in a 1000-1500 RPM powerband. That can work for a dragstrip only car, but you'd be very disappointed in that for a street car.

The stock turbo itself is capable of providing 25+lbs of boost. It won't be efficient doing it, but it can provide that much boost to your stock engine. The turbos ultimate boost is controlled by the engines computer and the turbo's wastegate actuator, not by the size of the turbo. Here is an example, I got my 85 GLHT into the upper 12's at the dragstrip 30+ years ago running a stock sized turbo. In other words, running about 20+ MPH and close to three seconds quicker ET's than a stock GLHT/SC without touching the turbo. My point is they're many other things to do to your car for better performance before you need to bolt on a bigger turbo. Bolting on a larger turbo alone will result in a car that is less fun to drive, and will probably be slower out at the dragstrip.

My suggestion is to read about these engines. Here is one website to look into if you haven't seen it already. Tons of great info about these cars and engines. Look under turbo database. That ought to keep you busy for a while (lol).
Thank you very much this all has been extremely helpful I will do some research and then reassess what I will be doing
 

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That is a loaded question. There is much, much, more than bolting on a larger turbo into your SC and expecting it be fast, durable, and be fun to drive. Do a lot of research on these engines and find out what changed year to year. For example, the 85 Shelby Charger (with turbo) had beefier rods than the 86-88 T1. It also used a different cylinder head than the 86+ engines. The block itself is weaker in the 84-88 cars. The tranny being a a525, is far weaker than the later a520/555/523/568 manual transmissions. I'd be far more concerned about the tranny/clutch in your car, than the engine, as far as durability goes.

The turbo that is on your car is decent sized for a 2.2 liter engine. It can support efficiently around 250 HP before it becomes less efficient. Turbo's are a compromise, like other things in engines. Carburetors, injectors, and camshafts are other examples of bigger isn't always better. A larger turbo increases HP in upper RPM's, but losses HP in lower RPM's because it takes longer to spool the larger turbo. So for example your stock turbo can develop full boost around 2500 RPM, while a much larger turbo will only reach full boost until 5000 RPM or later. A stock 2.2 engine will rev to around 6000-6300 RPM before it loses efficiency. So by bolting on a much larger turbo, you've dramatically decreased the useable powerband by 2500 RPM! For a street car, you want a nice broad powerband, and not an engine that runs great in a 1000-1500 RPM powerband. That can work for a dragstrip only car, but you'd be very disappointed in that for a street car.

The stock turbo itself is capable of providing 25+lbs of boost. It won't be efficient doing it, but it can provide that much boost to your stock engine. The turbos ultimate boost is controlled by the engines computer and the turbo's wastegate actuator, not by the size of the turbo. Here is an example, I got my 85 GLHT into the upper 12's at the dragstrip 30+ years ago running a stock sized turbo. In other words, running about 20+ MPH and close to three seconds quicker ET's than a stock GLHT/SC without touching the turbo. My point is they're many other things to do to your car for better performance before you need to bolt on a bigger turbo. Bolting on a larger turbo alone will result in a car that is less fun to drive, and will probably be slower out at the dragstrip.

My suggestion is to read about these engines. Here is one website to look into if you haven't seen it already. Tons of great info about these cars and engines. Look under turbo database. That ought to keep you busy for a while (lol).
Todd & all:

What about going with a Garrett GT or GTX turbo?
TurbosUnleashed - Garrett Dual Ball Bearing GT Ser
Would the dual ball bearing design and other features add up to better low end performance and a quicker spool up?
What about changing out the A525 for an A520, A555 or A568 with these:
 

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Todd & all:

What about going with a Garrett GT or GTX turbo?
TurbosUnleashed - Garrett Dual Ball Bearing GT Ser
Would the dual ball bearing design and other features add up to better low end performance and a quicker spool up?
What about changing out the A525 for an A520, A555 or A568 with these:
Absolutely! Technology has grown by leaps and bounds in the last 40 years with turbos. Forward Motion's turbo guy has been putting in clipped turbine wheels and compressor wheels from The 2860, 2871, 3071 GT's for some time with very good results. I'm sure any good turbo rebuilder could do the same. The only problem with just bolting on a complete GT ball bearing turbo is the unique Chrysler bolt pattern is not offered. You either need to modify the exhaust manifolds outlet bolt pattern, or modify the Chrysler exhaust housing to mate to the GT's turbine. TU charges $450 additional for the Chrysler housing option alone. This puts the Gen II turbo over 2K! excluding swingvalve, oil and coolant lines. $2500 by the time it is ready to work on your turbo Dodge. Many people that own turbo Dodges, don't have $2500 in their entire car (lol):giggle:
Garrett GT and GTX gen 1's are expensive, and the gen 2's are crazy expensive. IIRC, the compressor side on the gen 2's flows like 20% more than the first gen ball bearing turbos.
Yes Steve's a520/a555 makes installing those trannies almost a bolt in in the L-bodies. If you have good fab skills, you could duplicate the kit that Steve sells. The a523/a568 still requires the use of a cable shifter as it is a three plane shifter and the l-bodies are two plane.
The three shift rod options Steve sells are nice. Two of the three versions require removal of the factory shifter fulcrums. Which require removal of all brackets from car. Unfortunately, all three do introduce a bit of vibration and noise into the shifter. Some find the noise increase negligible, while others find it completely unacceptable. The third option (which retains the factories 16mm ball) is very nice, but installing those stainless wire clips in car without losing any of them, is very difficult. Chances are big you'll lose one or more while trying to install. Not sure if Steve offers replacement clips. Like the conversion bracket, you can easily make these if you have decent fab skills. If your fab skills aren't so great, then the shift rods Steve sells are worth every penny.
 

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Absolutely! Technology has grown by leaps and bounds in the last 40 years with turbos. Forward Motion's turbo guy has been putting in clipped turbine wheels and compressor wheels from The 2860, 2871, 3071 GT's for some time with very good results. I'm sure any good turbo rebuilder could do the same. The only problem with just bolting on a complete GT ball bearing turbo is the unique Chrysler bolt pattern is not offered. You either need to modify the exhaust manifolds outlet bolt pattern, or modify the Chrysler exhaust housing to mate to the GT's turbine. TU charges $450 additional for the Chrysler housing option alone. This puts the Gen II turbo over 2K! excluding swingvalve, oil and coolant lines. $2500 by the time it is ready to work on your turbo Dodge. Many people that own turbo Dodges, don't have $2500 in their entire car (lol):giggle:
Garrett GT and GTX gen 1's are expensive, and the gen 2's are crazy expensive. IIRC, the compressor side on the gen 2's flows like 20% more than the first gen ball bearing turbos.
Yes Steve's a520/a555 makes installing those trannies almost a bolt in in the L-bodies. If you have good fab skills, you could duplicate the kit that Steve sells. The a523/a568 still requires the use of a cable shifter as it is a three plane shifter and the l-bodies are two plane.
The three shift rod options Steve sells are nice. Two of the three versions require removal of the factory shifter fulcrums. Which require removal of all brackets from car. Unfortunately, all three do introduce a bit of vibration and noise into the shifter. Some find the noise increase negligible, while others find it completely unacceptable. The third option (which retains the factories 16mm ball) is very nice, but installing those stainless wire clips in car without losing any of them, is very difficult. Chances are big you'll lose one or more while trying to install. Not sure if Steve offers replacement clips. Like the conversion bracket, you can easily make these if you have decent fab skills. If your fab skills aren't so great, then the shift rods Steve sells are worth every penny.
Yeah I saw the prices on the GTX units they definitely are pricey.
Hats off to Steve in filling in the gaps on lots of much needed products btw.
 

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Copper wire O rings in receiver grooves on deck and ARP head studs advised if you have 12lbs boost or more, See if Wiseco will make you a set of forged pistons. Had a 2.2 with those at .010 clearance . They have some piston slap that clears up in a few minutes after a cold start . These are things I had to do to keep my turbo Caravan from blowing head gaskets and cracking pistons
 
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