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I don't believe it would work, at least not easily. I don't have any personal experience with them, but looking at the Chilton manual it appears it would be a poor design. It is designed to handle only a portion of the power from the engine, not full drive power. I am assuming it isn't as robust as a standard diff. Adapting the input shaft is the next obstacle. It uses a torque tube to transfer power, not a standard driveshaft with U-joint. Some machining would be required to get it to bolt up. Next, it has an overrunning clutch, which is what allows it to transfer power only when needed. It does appear that the overrunning clutch is a separate module from the diff, and just bolts to the front. I wouldn't imagine there would be any aftermarket support for it, and it is an open type diff. (no LSD). I was thinking the same thing, but after looking at the exploded view, I would probably go with a different diff. Look on ebay for a LSD E30 BMW diff. (or similar)That might be a better choice. Plenty strong and lots of part support. Then adapt axles and driveshaft to fit. You would still need a Caravan rear axle assembly, especially hubs.
 

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I'd agree. The parts aren't designed for all the power. The torque tube wouldn't accept a regular driveshaft anyway. Might be interesting to see if a Ford 8.8" IRS diff would work. Cheap and easy to find in Thunderbirds... Am I understanding you want to use the AWD rear axle and all too? Are you needing the diff to be solid to the body for any real reason? I mean, I'd rather have a true solid rear axle. I'd just make life easy and get a Chrysler 8.25 from a Dakota and move the spring perches. Or maybe something bigger if you are making big horsey power and torque numberz....
 

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I understand the fact that an awd rearend is not designed for all the power and probably wouldnt hold up, but I have seen kits for awd cars that make them rear wheel drive and it uses the same rearend thats already there. So apperently there is someway of making it work?
 

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I'd agree. The parts aren't designed for all the power. The torque tube wouldn't accept a regular driveshaft anyway. Might be interesting to see if a Ford 8.8" IRS diff would work. Cheap and easy to find in Thunderbirds... Am I understanding you want to use the AWD rear axle and all too? Are you needing the diff to be solid to the body for any real reason? I mean, I'd rather have a true solid rear axle. I'd just make life easy and get a Chrysler 8.25 from a Dakota and move the spring perches. Or maybe something bigger if you are making big horsey power and torque numberz....
dont use a 4 cylinder dak rear end they are 7.25 lol they brake easy:shrug:
 

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I'm getting ready to throw about 500hp to a Datsun 4banger rear end with tiny u-joints haha

I'm not sure what's gonna happen, it held up to a 283 and a 327 small block chevy for over 30 years. :D
 

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I know what will happen...heh, or rather what will happen under abuse...any rear can hold up to daily driving...personally I will be using a 8.8" ford under my celica...best option for me simply because of gear choices and aftermarket support for things like air lockers while remaining a good deal lighter than a 9"....I can get a 8.8 from an explorer with rear discs and 3.73 gearing for $150(no chance of it being short enough to fit under the celica...but then no rear end is except the junky celica rear) so all in all, I feel a shortened 8.8" is the best compromise...if I wanted IRS I could get a t-bird or mark viii 8.8" and shorten the axles and make my own control arms and diff carrier and still have the same aftermarket support
 

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Isn't a Ford 8.8 almost bullet proof?
 

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turboA 9 inch is bulletproof(or close enough) but a 8.8 can take more torque than i will ever be able to throw at it with a 2.4 turbo
ok i am just saying this now before it gets out of hand like everything else lol i am NOT saying your wrong. ok

but the ford 9 has a weak point where the pinion bolts in brakes off and shoots it out the front. lol or if your doing hard dumps of the clutch it brakes the axle tube weld, but other wise if its after market yes they are bulletproof,

but i'd rather have a mopar 8.3/4 lol takes less power to run than the ford 9 and is just as strong for the price,
 

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I will be using a 9" for my mustang...but considering these days its almost cheaper to buy aftermarket 9" housings and chunks anyway thats no surprise(besidses, its in a classic ford) as for the 8 3/4" being stronger stock for stock...I couldnt say, I'm not building(nor have I ever built) a 502 big block making 800ft/lb here, I'm building a 4 cylinder that will make maybe 350ft/lb for this application...but for this car the 8.8 is the most sensible solution in terms of weight, strength, aftermarket support, and available gear ratios and disc brakes out of the box
 

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I will be using a 9" for my mustang...but considering these days its almost cheaper to buy aftermarket 9" housings and chunks anyway thats no surprise(besidses, its in a classic ford) as for the 8 3/4" being stronger stock for stock...I couldnt say, I'm not building(nor have I ever built) a 502 big block making 800ft/lb here, I'm building a 4 cylinder that will make maybe 350ft/lb for this application...but for this car the 8.8 is the most sensible solution in terms of weight, strength, aftermarket support, and available gear ratios and disc brakes out of the box
i agree the 9'' is probly cheaper if bought as after market lol, and the 8.8 you can go 4 or 5 lug and they are just as strong, i've seen 10second mustangs on 8.8's :D
 
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