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ok a while ago on my 1990 voyager it started having bottom end noises. Couldn't tell if it was a rod bearing or maybe the balance shaft.... I'm building a new block for the van and needed some hardware from the old one. I took the oil pan off and started pulling the rods and no play at all. I looked at the balance shaft chain and it was limp. I then rotated my crank and it was slapping the one runner real hard. I have a video of it slapping it and how much play it has. I need to know if it was the balance shaft making the noise, then I'll know if the block is still good. I'm in neck deep already in this new block but at least I'll know I have a good spare!MOL008_zpsc56d46cb.mp4 Video by wes2s | Photobucket

hope the video works, for some reason its not working on photobucket but you can download the video and it works just fine.... maybe an admin could download it and post it for me that would be great!
 

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I have Never heard of the balance shafts failing on chrysler cylinder engines. The drive chain being worn or stretched out is a different story. I do like the smoothness of these balance shaft equipped Chrysler 4 cylinder engines! (2.5, some 1990+ 2.2, and 2.4s)
 

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I've seen a couple of low mileage failed Engines due to worn balance shafts.

This can cause be an internal oil leak as they are pressure fed from the main oil gallery.

Yours looks like the assembly is loose on the block but that might be an illusion??

I've never seen a chain that loose so it could be the noise.

I eliminate them on all my 2.5 Turbo Engines and have never noticed any smoothness difference.

Normally I cut the chain, remove the assembly and plug the oil feed hole.

Thanks
Randy
 

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No it's not an illusion. I did find chain slack on a couple engines in the past, but not enough to make noise, and the guides are adjustable for that reason. A 4 cylinder normally vibrates more than a 6 or 8 cylinder engine, due to the fact there's fewer firing per revolution, and the geometric configuration of the rotating assembly. Not everyone notices the difference and some who do, don't care either. But there are some people who are annoyed by it. Those shafts "cancels" this. The manufacturers wouldn't simply install them for no reason or if they did absolutely nothing. By the way, I have heard more stories about problems with balance shafts on Mitsubishi engines, where they're located in the block, VS a case in the crankcase. Including some that are belt-driven and will take out the timing belt. Unfortunately those systems are more work/difficult to delete.
 

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cut chain
remove balance shaft assy
plug oil feed hole
replace pan
burn chevy bowtie , break ford oval
say quick prayer

it's about all you can do ..
 

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cut chain
remove balance shaft assy
plug oil feed hole
replace pan
burn chevy bowtie , break ford oval
say quick prayer

it's about all you can do ..

That's how simple the process is with the Chrysler design. Other companies put them in the actual block, so it's more work.
 

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I eliminate them on all my 2.5 Turbo Engines and have never noticed any smoothness difference.

Normally I cut the chain, remove the assembly and plug the oil feed hole.

Thanks
Randy
Ding Ding Ding!!!

you won't notice any smoothness difference. Why? Because inline 4's are inherantly balanced.

Balance shafts are for secondary vibrations. What are those? Open your hood, (non-lbodies work the best) on a car without balance shafts. See that very slow bouncing in the hood. like every second or so. That's that balance shafts cancel. You won't feel it in the car.

Remove them like stated and never look back.
 
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