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Old School Hot Rodder
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Ignition noise suppression capacitor. It gets rid of the ignition static in the radio, particularly on AM stations.
 

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Old School Hot Rodder
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One or two wires going to it? Is it white and square or a round cylinder?
Are you asking about the coil or capacitor? Chrysler had two coils, a round can style in the first picture and a square one that bolts to the thermostat neck mounting studs. The round can uses a radio suppression capacitor attached to the bracket and the positive terminal of the coil with a pigtail.

The square one has a 2 pin plug and no capacitor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, what I need to know is what one my 88 Daytona needs? I have a round cylinder coil and no Ignition noise suppression capacitor and there is a 2 pin wire there. I found a Ignition noise suppression capacitor with 2 small cylinders on it but it has the wrong 2 pin plug plus another 3 pin plug.
 

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Old School Hot Rodder
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The two pin plug near your coil is probably for an unused solenoid valve. How about a picture of the area and the part you found. I am drawing a complete blank from your description and what I have for information.
 

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1992 dodge shadow es turbo
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Are you asking about the coil or capacitor? Chrysler had two coils, a round can style in the first picture and a square one that bolts to the thermostat neck mounting studs. The round can uses a radio suppression capacitor attached to the bracket and the positive terminal of the coil with a pigtail.

The square one has a 2 pin plug and no capacitor.
I’m talking about a resistor or a capacitor. The old dodge resistor is white with two wires which is not factory on our cars but sometimes required if an aftermarket coil is installed.
 

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Old School Hot Rodder
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If needed for an aftermarket coil, then the manufacturer should provide it, either included or available. Many cars when 12V ignition systems first came out in the 50s had them as the coils were still 6 volt and 12 volt feeds were used during starting only. Ford and GM used resistance wires in the harness, Chrysler continued using the resistor, even using a dual one on the early electronic systems.

European manufacturers went to 12 volt coils, and one of the go to performance coils was a big aluminum can Lucas Sport Coil. It did not use a resistor of any kind. Bosch used coils with built in resistors that couldn't be bypassed.
 

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1992 dodge shadow es turbo
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907 Posts
That might have gone to the thing-a-ma-jig. Probably for optional equipment, surely a Daytona guy on here knows
 

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Old School Hot Rodder
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Ok, that plug is up front as I can see the EVAP canister under it. I can't tell the wire colors though. It might be for fog or driving lights and looks like it has never been connected.
 
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