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Discussion Starter #1
I should have started looking for these a long time ago, before I was ready to attach the rear spoiler. Does anyone know where I can get the screws that attach the spoiler to the body?

Spoiler Screws - small.jpg


I've removed 3 spoilers and have almost never gotten a good screw that would be reusable. The rearmost section acually has the screws broken off. I still haven't figured out how I am going to remove them, so any tips would be appreciated.
 

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Good luck, I've never found them either. A similar, but larger version holds the nose on. I used to have a ready source for the ones for the nose. I worked in a plant that made the fiberglass nose & tail panels for the 4th Gen Camaro & Firebird. We had cases of those studs laying around. But that was 16 years ago...

When I repainted my Daytona, I took a stud with me to my local Ace hardware store, and found some long self tapping screws that matched the half that goes into the fiberglass spoiler. I then just screwed the spoiler on from underneath, no more nuts to worry about losing. Been on there over a year now, and no issues.
 

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Back in 93 I had the rear window molding replaced and when they removed the spoiler the self threading portion of the spoiler stud stripped out inside the spoiler.

I opened the holes slightly ran a tap into the holes and inserted heli-coils into the spoiler and held them in with epoxy.
I then used threaded studs that I ran into the heli-coil and applied loctite to the stud so they would not come out.

Now the studs are in permanently and use nuts on the other end to secure the spoiler to
the rear deck.

I do not remember the exact size I used but it was only slightly larger than the OE stud size.
Needless to say I have not had to remove the spoiler since but it has not loosened in 24 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies. They are all good options. I'll let you know when I decide which one to go with.

As I said, the rear section is my main problem, as the studs corroded into the spoiler and broke off, protruding from it. I will have to grind them down and drill them out, but they are already painted and I don't want to scratch them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I came up with 3 methods for the repairing both the rear and side spoilers.
The side spoilers were the easiest. I found some 10-24 woodworking studs, at the hardware store. They were way too long, but I cut both ends down and rethreaded the standard threads to be M6x1.0.

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (5)_small.jpg

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2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (1)_small.jpg

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (4)_small.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The rear section required a lot more work. 4 of the 5 studs were broken and locked into the fiberglass. I finally decided to grind the studs flat, so that I could drill off the flat disks, like you would a rivet. Then I had to deal with the studs.

What I needed was a hollow drill that would allow me to core out the stud. I found that hardware stores sell a hollow diamond saw for cutting ceramic tiles. You can pick one up for under $15. I chose a 3/8". To cut into the fiberglass, I cut 3 slots, at an angle, into the end.

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (15)_small.jpg

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I had to drill almost an inch deep, to remove the stud.

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (9)_small.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Now I had to come up with a way to install female threads. My first method was to use nuts, and epoxy them into the holes. I drilled the holes to be 7/16", to accept the M6x1.0 nuts, which are 10mm hex.
2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (16)_small.jpg

Make sure that the nuts do not touch each other, or you might end up with a locknut scenario, which would prevent the bolt threading through. Spacing will also allow the epoxy to surround more of the nuts.

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (17)_small.jpg

Make sure that the bolts sit perpendicular to the spoiler.

I'll post more tomorrow night.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The epoxy method didn't work as well as I had hoped. I ended up converting the 4 end mounts to woodworking threaded inserts. I tapped the internal threads to be M6x1.0.

Threaded Insert_small.jpg

One of the holes was a little large, so I ended up using epoxy in it, with the insert, so that the insert was closer to the surface.

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (18)_small.jpg

After installing, the spoiler clamped down tightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I made the center mount a stud, so that I can use it for alignment. The broken one was easier to remove, as I could just cut it out.

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (8)_small.jpg

I used a bolt and flat nut, to provide some surface area.

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (12)_small.jpg

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A little epoxy and it made a strong stud.

2017-12-20 - Rear Spoiler Repair  (14)_small.jpg
 
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