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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, figured I'd show my cheap arse OCC, used a body wash bottle from my GF was free, hoses like $5, Plastic T and 90 degee adapters around $6, so like $11 in the hole for this would be the cost, although I'm sure I spent more for misc adapters and hose clamps.

So on with the show, heres a pic of the bottle up close, mixed driving and easily 2400+miles:


another showing the engine, just finished installing my SILLA aluminum radiator(ain't I a pic whore):


This is using Castrol GTX 5w-30 dino oil with a quart of Marvel Mystery Oil.

So whats the thoughts, good, bad, indifferent, I'm thinking its decent, maybe 3/4 to a cup worth of oil.
 

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Yep, hooked up the front and back covers to it, just connect them to a plastic T adapter then used the 3rd side of the T to the OCC.
 

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Now all you need is a BOV. ;)
you gotta have a turbo for a BOV =)

I do have a question!
I am thinking about making one of these for my baron
Does your hook to the intake pressure or did you vent yours to the atmosphere?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
you gotta have a turbo for a BOV =)

I do have a question!
I am thinking about making one of these for my baron
Does your hook to the intake pressure or did you vent yours to the atmosphere?
Its vented to the atmosphere

how are you moving air through it? I see no outlet.
If you look by the screw cap you see I drilled little holes around the edge of the bottle (4 holes actually). Being at the top helps keep oil in the OCC, or should it be called a OCB (oil catch bottle ;) )
 

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I hope you wont think me too critical Rougetrip. :)

The back valve vent also draws in air though, and the way you have that set up it wont be filtered. The 3.0 also needs some vac back there I believe.
 

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I hope you wont think me too critical Rougetrip. :)

The back valve vent also draws in air though, and the way you have that set up it wont be filtered. The 3.0 also needs some vac back there I believe.
Neither the front or the rear cover should be drawing air in! The purpose of even having vents on the valve covers are to vent positive pressure in the crankcase from blow-bye from the combustion chamber, they should always be pushing air out (even at idle it pushes air)! unfortunately when they do make a vent oil vapor will also be escaping and the manufacturers use the intake to draw the the oil vapor in to be burned off by the engine for 1) lazy people/less maintenance 2) Lower Emissions.

When people put a air filter on the back vent (yes I did it) it was to catch most of the oil vapor before hitting the atmosphere which in time just soaks the filter and makes it useless, i'm just avoiding filters all together now and replacing PCV valves every so often.

off topic but our engines were even low enough on emissions to not need a EGR valve, most 3.0's before 92 didn't even come with a EGR setup, Mine did not have one, just another power robbing item to burn extra fuel and creates another item to fail over time.
 

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Neither the front or the rear cover should be drawing air in! The purpose of even having vents on the valve covers are to vent positive pressure in the crankcase from blow-bye from the combustion chamber, they should always be pushing air out (even at idle it pushes air)! unfortunately when they do make a vent oil vapor will also be escaping and the manufacturers use the intake to draw the the oil vapor in to be burned off by the engine for 1) lazy people/less maintenance 2) Lower Emissions.
Remember how confused I was about this last year? Well, I have been studying up since then. :D

Take a look at the OE air filter box for our 3.0 engines. See how the back valve cover vent is connected, by a hose, to the air filter housing?

The purpose of positive crankcase ventilation, is in part, to flush out accumulated combustion gases that build up in the crankcase from blow-by, with fresh filtered air drawn in through a corresponding PCV system intake vent. The other important reason for PCV, is the reduction of crankcase pressure, which builds up from blow-by during on throttle operation.

Our 3.0 engine, under low or no throttle condition of increased manifold vacuum, draws fresh air in through the air filter in the OE filter housing connected to the back valve cover vent, by that manifold vacuum created by piston down stroke. This fresh filtered air is then drawn through the crankcase to the forward valve cover, then into the PCV valve at the lower intake and down into the combustion chambers.

How could our cross flow crankcase ventilation system work, if fresh air could not be drawn in at idle and throttle let up, to replace those gases? If a PCV system does not allow fresh air to be vented in, at idle and throttle let up, then the manifold vacuum through the PCV valve could only try to suck blow-by gases into the crankcase when the engine is idling or at throttle let up, when there are fewer combustion cycles and hence little or no blow-by.

When people put a air filter on the back vent (yes I did it) it was to catch most of the oil vapor before hitting the atmosphere which in time just soaks the filter and makes it useless, i'm just avoiding filters all together now and replacing PCV valves every so often.
Remember that oil vapor did vent out though.

At idle and throttle letup, when manifold vac is high, crankcase gases vent from back to front and out through the crankcase to the PCV valve. When the throttle is open and manifold vacuum drops, blow-by crankcase gases vent from the crankcase, being drawn by the vacuum at the throttle body. Well at least it is supposed to, and that is why the back valve cover vent was connected to the the OE filter box. The on throttle function of PCV, prevents the crankcase from pressurizing, which impedes piston down stroke and stresses seals, .... and other bad stuff. :)

Those engineers know what they are doing Roguetrip. :)

But I didn't know what I was doing when I first wrote this post. Now edited for accuracy, you can see the original mess, which Clayton quoted below. Oh the shame! :( ..... LOL!
 

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Remember how confused I was about this last year? Well, I have been studying up since then.

Take a look at the OE air filter box for our 3.0 engines. See how the back valve cover vent is connected, by a hose, to the air filter housing?

The purpose of positive crankcase ventilation, is in part, to flush out accumulated combustion gases that build up in the crankcase from blow-by, with fresh filtered air drawn in through a corresponding PCV system intake vent. The other important reason for PCV, is the reduction of crankcase pressure, which builds up from blow-by during on throttle operation.

Our 3.0 engine, under low or no throttle condition of increased manifold vacuum, draws fresh air in through the air filter in the OE filter housing connected to the back valve cover vent, by that manifold vacuum created by piston down stroke. This fresh filtered air is then drawn through the crankcase to the forward valve cover, then into the PCV valve at the lower intake and down into the combustion chambers.

How could our cross flow crankcase ventilation system work, if fresh air could not be drawn in at idle and throttle let up, to replace those gases? If a PCV system does not allow fresh air to be vented in, at idle and throttle let up, then the manifold vacuum through the PCV valve could only try to suck blow-by gases into the crankcase when the engine is idling or at throttle let up, when there are fewer combustion cycles and hence little or no blow-by.



Remember that oil vapor did vent out though.

At idle and throttle letup, when manifold vac is high, crankcase gases vent from back to front and out through the crankcase to the PCV valve. When the throttle is open and manifold vacuum drops, blow-by crankcase gases vent from the crankcase, being drawn by the vacuum at the throttle body. Well at least it is supposed to, and that is why the back valve cover vent was connected to the the OE filter box. The on throttle function of PCV, prevents the crankcase from pressurizing, which impedes piston down stroke and stresses seals, .... and other bad stuff.

Those engineers know what they are doing Roguetrip.
You're right.
 

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So why did my back valve cover vent spit oil out when I was doing high rpm pulls in fourth? I had no hose or anything hooked to it at the time, now I have a hose going to my air intake. It wasn't even enough oil to register on the dipstick but it made a nice cloud and dressed my motor and firewall in oil.
 

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Thank you Clayton. :) ..... I was partly wrong though. :(

When the throttle plate is open and manifold vacuum is low, the rear valve cover vent .... really only allows blow-by caused crank case gas pressure ..... to vent into the air stream between the air filter and the throttle body, to be sucked into the throttle body intake air stream and down to the pistons.

It doesn't really reverse cross flow. Where would the fresh air be venting in from in that case?

I think I got down now. :D
 

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So why did my back valve cover vent spit oil out when I was doing high rpm pulls in fourth? I had no hose or anything hooked to it at the time, now I have a hose going to my air intake. It wasn't even enough oil to register on the dipstick but it made a nice cloud and dressed my motor and firewall in oil.
It was venting crankcase gas pressure caused by blow-by.
 

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Since we are talking PCV venting, For a while I have been toying with the idea of getting a vacuum pump and using that instead of the intake runners to provide vaccum for the crankcase.

Then I could fill that divits in the runners. Should improve runner flow and a real vacuum in the crankcase should improve ring seal.

Opinions? Vacuum pump recommendations?
 

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Since we are talking PCV venting, For a while I have been toying with the idea of getting a vacuum pump and using that instead of the intake runners to provide vaccum for the crankcase.

Then I could fill that divits in the runners. Should improve runner flow and a real vacuum in the crankcase should improve ring seal.

Opinions? Vacuum pump recommendations?
IMO "a real vacuum in the crankcase" as you speak of, would resist piston upstroke, which would not be good for obvious reasons, .... including ..... the repetitive spikes in vacuum traction caused by piston upstroke, .... that could actually increase blow-by. The same could even adversely affect both ring and cylinder bore .... oil film distribution .... to decrease ring seal even as it also increases both ring and cylinder wear.

I believe that one important part of PCV, is the maintaining of proper crankcase gas pressure, and either too much, or too little like an actual vacuum, will cause all sorts of problems in addition to those I theorized above.

For example the constant thump thump thump of vacuum spikes, as the pistons move up and down, may even also trash engine seals over time. Our engines were not designed to deal with such an issue, and keeping the PCV system functionally as close to OE as possible is the best policy .... IMO. :)
 

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IMO "a real vacuum in the crankcase" as you speak of, would resist piston upstroke, which would not be good for obvious reasons, .... including ..... the repetitive spikes in vacuum traction caused by piston upstroke, .... that could actually increase blow-by. The same could even adversely affect both ring and cylinder bore .... oil film distribution .... to decrease ring seal even as it also increases both ring and cylinder wear.
Read a little about this. Using a vacuum pump is a common way for racers to get rings to seat better and _increase_hp. My understanding is can actually decrease blow-by.

A far bigger resistance to the pistons is the volume of trapped air above it...

I believe that one important part of PCV, is the maintaining of proper crankcase gas pressure, and either too much, or too little like an actual vacuum, will cause all sorts of problems in addition to those I theorized above.
There is such a thing as too much crankcase vacuum, but that is on the order of 15-16"
 
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