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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What type of paint was used on these aluminum bumpers? I have one riddled with rock chips and want to refinish it. Is sand blasting the go-to method or Paint stripper? Thanks for your Help. Todd, you there?
 

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I can't comment on paint color or stripping methods, but back when I had my GLHT, I had 2 original Omni bumpers (silver) powder coated in satin black. Hard to see the effect in a picture but my GLHT is the one in the top banner. I never had to worry about paint chipping either. If I can find some additional photos I'll post here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can't comment on paint color or stripping methods, but back when I had my GLHT, I had 2 original Omni bumpers (silver) powder coated in satin black. Hard to see the effect in a picture but my GLHT is the one in the top banner. I never had to worry about paint chipping either. If I can find some additional photos I'll post here.
Thanks Omniac.... Silver GLH with Red interior is my favorite!
I was doing some paint work on my Gold Dust GLH today and between coats etc etc....I busted out the sander and went at the bumper with 60 grit and worked up to 320 looks good enough for primer and then a final sand and then SEM trim Black for the final finish.....I need to see if I can find 2 more bumpers in my hoard to get powder coated in the future.
 

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I can shed some light on this subject. The bumpers were black anodized, not painted at all. Obviously that was a mistake, as they started chipping almost the day they left the dealership.

Powdercoating is definitely the way to go. 20% gloss is about right. Similar in color to the SEM trim black. Your powdercoater will know exactly what 20% gloss means. IMO, much more gloss than that and it doesn't look quite correct. I've done them in 10% gloss too, That is just a bit less gloss.

Prepping is the key. You want to remove all the anodizing. You really should sandblast with something more aggressive than glass bead. Crushed glass works better than glass bead for powdercoating. Northern Tool has very inexpensive Black Diamond (coal slag). Better yet but much more expensive is aluminum oxide. A pressure blaster will make quick work out of it, inside a blast cabinet (if you have a big cabinet) goes much slower because it will probably be a siphon blaster.

I've also painted them several times. The key here is to use a good epoxy primer, followed by a catalyzed black with flattener added. This gets tricky, as the flattening additive is sensitive to humidity in the air. The key is to use a catalyzed paint. I'm afraid the SEM trim black will be a short lived fix for you. IMO, not nearly strong enough.
I just did a set this late winter. They were about $50-60 each at the local powdercoater with me doing all the prep work.

Powdercoating is ideal for these bumpers. Catalyzed paint will also hold up way better than what the factory used.
Many powdercoaters also have sandblasting services too. Unless you have the paints in hand, powdercoating will probably be cheaper than painting. Both will yield amazing results.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Todd, this will go in the memory bank. For now I am sanding and repainting the rear bumper that I am working on BUT I will look for 2 more to have powdercoated in the future. It's nice that these are the same bumper front and rear. I like how you took the center section out to enhance air flow!!!! super trick!
 

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Thanks Todd, this will go in the memory bank. For now I am sanding and repainting the rear bumper that I am working on BUT I will look for 2 more to have powdercoated in the future. It's nice that these are the same bumper front and rear. I like how you took the center section out to enhance air flow!!!! super trick!
Thanks, Yes I agree with the interchangeability. You wouldn't believe how much stronger it is than the regular bumper with those gusset plates welded in. About the same weight too. I'd guess 2-3 times the torsional strength, maybe more. Someone that was going to tow something small with their L-body (tiny trailer, motorcycle, sailboat, etc.) would be wise to add these gussets to their rear bumper. The bumper brackets look like they were made to shear off and crumple to absorb impact, as they have just a small tack weld in addition to those corrugated areas. Those areas where addressed as well when I tucked the bumpers in a few inches.
Stuffing a huge intercooler in front of the marginal size L-body radiator, well lets just say the radiator and intercooler can use all the help it can get with airflow getting to it.
 
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