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Hydrocarbons and...

Thanks
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter · #182 ·
Alrighty. New tools have arrived.

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This is the Dura-Bond stuff for reaming and installing cam bearing shells. Somehow i only ordered one set of bearings when i was sure i ordered two...

So ill learn how this works on a scrap head, then attempt to repair the head for my build.

~Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #183 ·
Gonna give it a test run and see what there is to learn. Dont sweat, this is a scrap swirl head that has a crack across the lash adjuster bore. No reasonable repair.

Made a fixture to bolt the head down to the table. I just cut some old head bolts down to do the clamping.

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Bolted down, this shows the ugly of the before state of this head.

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I dressed the caps and head with some 400 grit sandpaper on a flat surface to make sure there arent any high spots.

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Bar bushings in.

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Bar and cutter in. The cutter actually took some massaging with sand paper because a burr from the set screws made it hang up on the bar.

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This is after two successful cuts. There was a learning lesson. The cutter had a "F" on it that i assumed meant "Forward" or "Front" but it was chattering so desperately when attempting to cut. Eyeballing the tool, it appeared that the other end had a better taper to is and would cut better. After flipping it around, it cut much better, enabling the first successful pass.

The "F" must mean "F*ckin Back".

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Showing the quality of the finish. Im pretty impressed!

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In order to cut the last two caps, i would need to install the bearings to hold the bar bushing, but id rather not damage the shells. Ive got enough hands on at this point that ill just cut my head next and do a full install. Exciting.

I am probably going to tape off the next head simply to save on the clean up. The chips gets EVERYWHERE. No doubt that a full strip and clean is necessary.

Thanks again,
Mark
 

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I love watching this build.
 

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Discussion Starter · #186 ·
Alright, I've finished the clutch in Hellcat, and now it's time to get back on the GLH.

Time to take care of a little bit of the aesthetics to get the juices flowing again.

Paint the end of the block now that the seal retainers are glued on with the appropriate anaerobic gasket maker.

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And slather some color on with zero regard....
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That orange reflection of the wheel chock makes it look like a spot was missed... optical illusion!

Ans time to return to the scrubby valvecover that became so irritating attempting to mask.
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The golden ticket was to put a solid swatch of tape across the "chrysler" and paint that after by hand.

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My rattle can prowess let me down, and I left a few tiger stripes that remove any doubt that it was painted in someone's back yard.

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Discussion Starter · #187 ·
Next I move on to getting the sprockets installed. I got to install the cam seal that I bought 4 or 5 months ago, and then torque all of the sprockets on.

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I had to use the old belt... new one now on order....and yes I even used the factory tool that I have a hard time trusting.

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Finally degree the cam time.

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So I admit that I had more difficulty degreeing the cam than I had expected. My first recommendation is to get a 0-359 degree well instead of the 0-180-0 wheel that I've got. When you have two of the same number on the wheel, there is just another place to screw up. My next screw up was not making a solid lifter for taking my measurements. I spent a lot of time chasing my tail because of the variations that the lifter was causing. Nonetheless I got my head wrapped around the Process and will redo it all with my new belt and solid lifter. Stay tuned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #188 · (Edited)
Oh ya! I also picked up a bore scope because I failed to check my oil pump pickup clearance before I rtv'd (lightly albeit) my oil pan gaskets on.

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Play stupid games, win stupid prizes.
 

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Hey Mark,
I've always just painted the valve cover, then sanded the lettering and ribs off. Then cleared over all of it. You can do that same two step method powercoating too.
Here is one I just completed on my GLHT. Third picture is same deal except powdercoated on another GLHT. Forth pic is wrinkle black powdercoat.

Product Font Bicycle part Rectangle Nickel Motor vehicle Hood Automotive air manifold Automotive design Vehicle . Vehicle Motor vehicle Car Hood Blue Vehicle Car Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design
 

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Discussion Starter · #190 ·
That method worked very well for you! I did try that on my first go around, but the primer that I used feather poorly with the sanding. I wi clear coate the valvecover next, hopefully the tiger stripes disappear.

The intercooler on that T1 car is awesome!
I wonder how well it works with that placement. Surely an improvement to some degree.

Thank you,
Mark
 

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... The intercooler on that T1 car is awesome!
I wonder how well it works with that placement. Surely an improvement to some degree.
Thank you,
Mark
I have enhanced several things on the intercooler. Compared to the MP/DC interheater (over the turbo), it was WAY more effective. This log manifold car has had lots of tweaks done to it, so it runs pretty hard. Traps around 109-111 MPH on DOT legal tires. Has ran 106+ MPH since 1987. No spray, no E85, no excessive boost, just very efficient. Gets 35-37 MPH on the road too. The core itself is efficient to around 290 HP, according to Spearco.
That other blue SFB GLHT looks pretty stock too, but has run 12.0's around 115-116. Pretty stout for running through stock GLHS intercooler, stock airbox, and working AC. That one has had plenty done to it too. Walk softly and carry a big stick (lol).
 

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Discussion Starter · #192 ·
I received the power steering hoses, water pump and new timing belt.

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My goals for Sunday are finish the cam timing/degree, port the water pump, and check the oil pump clearance. Big Goals!
 

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Discussion Starter · #193 ·
So I got to try out the new bore scope first.

It is difficult to get the angles perfect, but it appears I have sufficient room for the oil pump. It looks like the bottom of the pan and the bottom of the pump pickup are not perfectly parallel.

Side of the pickup
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Bore scopes are kinda a pita to maneuver. It took me 10min to get it steady for these photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #194 ·
I got the valvecover cleaned and cleared.

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The clear didn't cure the evidence of my crappy paint job, so I took this photo at the best angle I could find to make it hard for yall to tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #195 · (Edited)
Time to make a solid lifter. First thing is to choose the used lifter that will have a new life.

Get some baseline measurements.

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Disassemble
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Remeasure at full collapse.
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Do math and find a nut that is a good candidate
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Put that nut to the grinder to lose some weight

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Test assemble
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And full assemble. Give it a nice red sharpie paint job for future ID.
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Now time to tackle that cam again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #196 · (Edited)
Woooow. So I screwed up again.... I went through the process of dropping the new solid lifter in, and measuring, and doing cam stuff... I got her all done.. And then it happened....

When I was "done" and was swapping the solid lifter for the pt lifter + shims, a shim came out of the lifter bore with my solid lifter...

I gotta do it all over again. 😩

Tomorrow maybe.
 

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Hey Mark,
Are you making your lash adjuster so it is fixed in the center of the collapsed and extended position? The reason I ask is that will get you close, but lots of camshafts esp. aftermarket and reground camshafts will be a bit off on lobe base circle. I even see different lash amounts from lobe to lobe (esp. on reground camshafts). This will have an effect on the lash and ultimately your camshaft degreeing.. You may end up with lash or having valve start to creep open unless you can zero the lash out with the lash adjuster.
The valve starting to creep open is really easy to see if using valve checking springs (much softer spring) and using your dial indicator. The lash and the preload can be seen with the dial indicator easily.
With your mad skills as a machinist and having access to a metal lathe, I'm sort of surprised you just didn't duplicate what DC/MP did making an adjustable lash adjuster. Can't remember if we were talking about this before on your project log, but someone like you that has the skills and the equipment, could probably sell quite a few of them to enthusiasts. People seem to always be looking for them if they're taking the time to degree their camshaft in. Anyway just a thought...
Here are a few pictures of the DC lash adjuster in case you haven't seen one. The aluminum piece is an adapter to space out the degree wheel on the early blocks so it clears the crankshaft seal housing. The lash adjuster is a couple/few thousands smaller OD so it slips in and out of the lifter bore easily.
Keep up the great work! I as well as others enjoy your project log. Refreshing to see someone doing their engine build the right way!
Household hardware Electronic device Tool Auto part Electronics accessory Cylinder Auto part Fashion accessory Font Electric blue Household hardware Cylinder Gas Auto part Camera accessory
More info on adjustable lash adjusters here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #198 ·
Now that is the exact tool that I needed! I that would be a solid project to make a few for the guy and sell at a reasonable price. It look like there is no jam nut nor locking mechanism? You just adjust it by hand and pretty much stays put for the minimal amount of time you are adjusting the cam?

I just finished dialing in the cam without the pt lifter shim. I was 2.5 crand degrees off, and that adjustment has now been made. I ended up advancing the cam by 12 degrees on the cam sprocket. This suggests I was a tooth off when installing the belt and could have ended up 6 degrees retarded? Either way, the cam is dialed in and lifting 0.005" at 28 degrees BTDC.

My process was:
1) Determine actual duration of cam with a dial indicator via reading the degree wheel when the valve was 0.005" just beginning to open and 0.005" from closing. Mathed out to 288°.

2) Divide total duration by 2 to determine the actual cam centerline. This case 144°.

3) Subtract the "installed centerline" of the cam. In this case 116°. Gives me a remainder of 28°.

4) Adjust cam so that valve is opening (0.005") 28° before top dead center. This means that the center of total duration is occuring at 116° after top dead center.

Crank bolt, tensioner, and cam sprocket have all been torqued.

Valve train DONE.
 

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Discussion Starter · #199 ·
Water pump time!

So the original waterpump clearly had been replaced before. Every gasket was thoroughly glued in with black rtv.

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Cleanup via pressure washer et al. I took some time to knock the casting line down off of the front of the housing. I'm pretty surprised by just how bad the casting is on this.

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It is too easy to burn an hour cleaning aluminum.

The pump asked surface was impressively bad. The factory Cleanup of the casting only kissed the caddy corners of the housing. So I spent some time sanding/lapping to get the surface closer to flay.

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Now time to start porting this thing out. It is obvious there are gains to be had in a few spots.

Thank you for the support guys.
 

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Hey Mark,
Here are some pics of early waterpump porting I've done. You can really improve that short turn if you spend the time doing it. There is a lot of meat there to whittle away. First two pics are before. Quite a difference between first and last picture huh?
Liquid Human body Hood Grey Tints and shades Cameras & optics Camera lens Camera accessory Material property Gas
Next are after porting.
Automotive tire Automotive design Rim Art Automotive wheel system White Composite material Gas Auto part Metal Automotive lighting Grey Automotive exterior Automotive design Automotive tire
There is one blind waterpump bolt hole that could get uncovered (where small hump is) at the top of the housing. Some are drilled deeper than others, so the depth varies. If I uncover it, I screw bolt in place and put a dab of JB weld to cover hole. I then make sure I use thread sealant on this one bolt in case the JB fails for any reason. Never has leaked after 30+ years of doing this. IMO, too much a PITA to get stinger in there to weld shut.

I would also run a tap through all the threaded holes. I believe there is only the one blind hole. That lower alternator bolt hole can snap the ear off if overtightened. Tapping and easy on the torque is the key here.

Also test fit waterpump for clearance especially after sanding the mating surface. Some people are reporting aftermarket pump blades hitting the housing.
Todd
 
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