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"Who's buying? It varies widely, but it's typically a married male, 55, with household income of $81,334. (Regular PT Cruiser buyer: 51 years old, evenly split between men and women, $52,268 household income.)"

Oops.. Guess i shouldn't have bought my PT... I'm 25, married, female and I WISH I made 81,000 AMERICAN dollars :D
 

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Seems like they can't do without mentioning the PT/Neon topic either.

Here the pretty much say it's different . . .
Chrysler began developing the PT Cruiser intending to use the platform of the Neon small car, a so-so seller, to create a vehicle with ''got-to-have'' appeal. So many changes to Neon underpinnings were necessary to create the original, 2001 Cruiser that it's not much Neon underneath. So, Chrysler got less bang for its sharing bucks than hoped.

And here we're back to the same . . .
That 2.4-liter, 215-horsepower, turbocharged, four-cylinder now sits beneath the bonnets of two dissimilar machines with opposing personalities: Neon SRT-4 (Test Drive, Feb. 7) and the PT Cruiser GT Turbo
Granted, we all know it's differnt even if there are parts shared but this is fuel for the uninformed.


But in the end they say the right thing . . .
If you like the look and don't need four-wheel drive, it's pretty hard to find a reason not to buy the GT Turbo.
:D
 

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No, no, they are all wrong. I am only 54! With traction control and ABS, it handles the snow almost as well as my Audi Quattro! :)
 

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Who's buying? It varies widely, but it's typically a married male, 55, with household income of $81,334. (Regular PT Cruiser buyer: 51 years old, evenly split between men and women, $52,268 household income.)
Hrm, I'm way down on the age, single, and up a bit on the income.

I'd love to see a real graph on buyer data.
 

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Fujmon said:
I wonder how they get these profiles, and how many owners actually fit them?
It's all in the math. Did they use averages or means?

An old professor of mine would never answer the question "what was the average on the test?". His reply was that "If all but one of you students made $5000 a year, and the other one had a family fortune of $50 million, the average student income would be very high. But the rest of you don't have that income. Averages are misleading."

As many things from his class that I've forgotten that one sticks with me.

Instead, he always plotted out the grade distrtibution with the tests, then you knew exactly where you were in relation to the rest of the class.
 
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