Turbo Dodge Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
1987 GLHS 0564
Joined
·
753 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking through the forum at ARP head stud torque values and I see several times final torque is 65 ftlbs. If you look up ARP kit 241-4701 it says final torque is the factory 90 ftlbs.

So now I am wondering why people say 65 ftlbs if ARPs instructions say 90 ftlbs? Did something change with ARPs values?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
Go with what ARP recommends and not what several folks say (lol). I see you're using the 241-4701 12 point kit. Good choice! I once found using the 241-4501 kit (six point hex bolts), that they hit the valve cover in the corners when valve cover was installed. Wonder if that contributed to numerous people that seem to snap off corners on their valve covers?
Careful if ever using ARP head BOLTS. Nice bolts, but they were made too long! They bottom out in cylinder head before they torque up to spec., unless you use two washers or run a bottoming tap on the block.
Wood Tool Font Office ruler Handwriting
 

·
Legendary Driver
Joined
·
11,047 Posts
I've always gone 45-65-85-85 on my arp studs. Then I idle the car till the fan cycles, shut the car off and let it cool over night and hit them at 85 again. Didn't do this the 1st time and got on the freeway the next morning with a couple psi and the head lifted and shot anti-freeze all over the airbox. Hasn't happened since I've done the retorquing procedure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
I read somewhere about using the old head bolts over again. (The Dodge Garage?) The idea is that the torque-to-yield bolts are O.K. to re-use them as long as they hold torque at 90 ft. lbs. If they stretch and do not hold the 90 lb. limit, they should be replaced. I have not used the ARP studs yet, but I believe that one should make sure that the final torque is around 85 to 90 lbs. after that final torque (1/4 TURN AFTER 65). The bolt stretch is what makes the fastening power. A similar problem can happen when tightening the rod bolts during an engine rebuild. Hot Rod magazine used a measure of bolt stretch and found that most of the rod bolts had not been stretched enough during the final torque. It is important to realize that the fastening power is not friction, but bolt stretch. That is why it is o.k. to lube the threads, or even use a thread chaser to reduce the friction.
 

·
Old School Hot Rodder
Joined
·
1,750 Posts
I will add this, USE ONLY THE SPECIFIED LUBRICANT, I had to prove this to a contractor building a new de ionized water system for my employer, Newport News Shipbuilding. They were using soapy water on the CRES bolts and nuts. Our nuclear quality people, QID, specified Neolube, a graphite in isopropyl alcohol lubricant. Procedure says "apply a coat on all mating parts, allow to dry and apply a second coat and allow to dry, then assemble and torque to spec.

We had a device, called a Skidmore-Wihelm bolt tension indicator, a hydraulic load cell the bolt goes through and is then tightened to what load is specified. You can actually see the load fall off when you reach the yield strength. Using Neolube as specified the required torque gave the clamping force desired, using it wet, a 5/8-11 Gr5 bolt, would come apart at about 60% of the required torque, felt like a cheap hardware store bolt.

We used soap and water, Neolube wet and dry and motor oil and the results were interesting to say the least.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top