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No, it does not matter 2.2 or 2.5. With every inline 4 cylinder automotive engine where I needed to pay attention to the firing order, it has been 1-3-4-2. And that includes the Ford 1.9, 2.3, Mazda B engine, Hyundai G4JS, and even the GM Quad 4 engines. It pretty much has to be since cylinders 1 and 4 are partners as well as 2 and 3 on at least the vast majority of I-4 engines.

The classic Volvo 4 cyl engines were as well, just to name another.
 

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...and keep in mind that on Ford "V" configuration engines, they number their cylinders differently. The "right bank" would be cylinders 1234 and the "left bank" would be 5678 on an 8 cylinder engine. I can't say how many other manufacturers do it that way. A Ford V-6 firing order of 1-4-2-5-3-6 would be the same as 1-2-3-4-5-6 in "Chevy/Chrysler talk" simply because they label their cylinders differently.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Thanks, you guys are always so helpful. I'm so glad I found this site a few years ago. You guys, especially Turismolover22 have been my car's savior. :thumb:

By the way when is it gonna stop saying new guy by my name? I'm not new anymore.LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I'm back, hope everyone had a Merry Christmas. Next question is... I had p/s pump and oil pan gasket replaced because of leaking. I'm still getting oil and it is oil on my timing belt. What could I check next? Valve cover gasket doesn't seem to be leaking. Also, since I'm getting oil on belt, I've been using brake fluid spray on belt to try and keep it clean. I'm worried about belt getting ruined from oil. Now, I know p/s fluid will eat it up but how about oil. In case I can't get to it right away. And does it hurt to use b/f spray cleaner on belt? Some one suggested going and having dye test done to see where leak is coming from. Is that a good idea? Didn't know they could do that with oil. OK enough questions. :confused:
 

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If oil is getting on the belt it is probably coming from either the Front Cam Seal or the Front Crank Seal.

You can easily remove the upper timing cover to look at the Front Cam Seal.
The Crank Seal is located behind the lower timing cover and cannot be seen without removal of all components that would be removed to replace the timing belt.

Oil will cause rubber to deteriorate/swell/soften so you want to get the condition corrected as soon as you can.
Brake Cleaner is used to clean almost everything that is covered with oil/grease(melts certain plastics)so occasionally spraying the belt should not be harmful.

Before installing dye be sure the entire engine compartment top and bottom are cleaned of all oil/grease so you can easily see new leaks.
Also, if you drive the vehicle before locating the leak the wind will/may blow the oil around making it more difficult to locate the origin of the leak.
 

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I personally would not use brake cleaner on your belt. It will shorten the lifespan of the belt. It's meant to remove grease/oil. Rubber is made from petroleum. Short term it could cause more damage than not, and will dry out the belt and cause it to crack long term.
 

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Power steering fluid, transmission fluid, and engine oil all have similar effects on rubber, and keep in mind that there are different kinds of rubber out there. Belts are not particularly happy with oil, but unless it soaks in it constantly and swells the rubber, it'll probably be okay. Brake fluid probably doesn't do the timing belt any good, but it is likely the lesser evil. It is what I would use to clean the belt. it is either that, or get a new belt.

If these cam, crank, and intermediate shaft seals are original, there is a very high probability that the rubber from which they are made is now rock hard like plastic and it'll crack and such. its time for new ones. Also, it always seems to happen to me when I install them, the metal spring that keeps the seal tight against the shaft slips out as the seal lip is flipped during installation. In addition, the shaft itself can have some significant imperfections that can tear up a seal in short order or just not make a good seal.

For all I know, the person who owned the car before you had it all apart and never even bothered to install a crankshaft seal. And yes, I have seen that before!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Next question, As I was driving last nite Friday in all the rain there aws a lot of water built up, everytime I went through water my alternator gauge would drop and power went down, like wipers real slow, sluggish. It would come back up in a little time. Sound like a loose belt, or should I have alternator (which I just put in 8 months ago) checked.
 

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Loose or slipping belt. My truck does that and the alt is near the bottom too. Water just gets on the belt and usually your alt pulley or crank pulley starts to slip till it "squeals" as it is drying off and slipping until it gets back to speed. If it doesnt do it during normal operation, and only from the occasional puddle, i personally would chalk it up to water splashing.
 

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Do you still have the belt guard inside the passenger wheel well?
It helps to prevent water and other debris from getting into the belt system.
If you can "SEE" the engine from the wheel well, the guard is missing.
 
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