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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was going through a box of car parts for my 89 csx that was given to me by the previous owner and I found what im sure to be the 2.4 PT Cruiser lifters, shims and valve seals upgrade. Cool!

How hard is it to install these? Simple as lifting the valve cover and throwing them in?
 

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I was going through a box of car parts for my 89 csx that was given to me by the previous owner and I found what im sure to be the 2.4 PT Cruiser lifters, shims and valve seals upgrade. Cool!

How hard is it to install these? Simple as lifting the valve cover and throwing them in?
Throwing them in??? Oh My!!!!
It is easy but you will need to need to keep the valves closed (air or rope) during seal replacement. I use a spring compressor like the one shown in the FSM. I would watch the OD of the shim as mine jammed at the bottom lifer hole.

here is my tool
 

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Assuming you have stock springs this is how you do it. Remove valve cover, Get 1/2" drive 10-12" extension. Move cam to base circle on follower by bumping the car in 5th gear or by turning crank/cam by the bolt if it's an auto. Now pry down on the top of the spring retainer with the end of the extension and the part of the cam BETWEEN the lobes so you don't damage them. You just have to pry enough to pull the follower out. Easier with 2 people. Once the follower is out you can pull the lifter out and swap in the PT lifter parts and replace the follower. I'd go down the line and replace all the ones you can get to without having to move the motor then do the rest which will probably be 1 or 2. I was the 2nd person to do this mod way back when and I did it with my g/f helping me at the time in my apartment carport. Just be careful and go slow and it's easy.
 

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91 Daytona Shelby 5Spd 2.5 T1, 85 New Yorker 2.2 T1, 89 LeBaron Convertible 2.5 T1, Many spare parts
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I do it the wrong way, but it works for me. After you take off the camshaft, followers, lifters, and spark plugs, turn the crank to a little (oh, 20-ish degrees) before TDC on the piston you're servicing. Feed nylon rope or twine in through the spark plug hole. Crank the motor forward until the twine is pressing up against the head. Pull the springs, seals, etc., as you normally would.

I'd like to mention that EVERY 2.5 head I've ever taken to the machine shop has had dropping valve guides. The "correct" fix is a huge undertaking. The machine shop always just holds the valve guide up and peens the head into it. That's the only real complication you could run into. Well, not really a complication but something you might notice while doing the job.

By the way, the nylon rope trick is how I remove pesky crank bolts. It's a good trick, but IF anyone chooses to reproduce the trick to hold the crank still, it's important to know that the valves are closed when the rope smashes against it. In changing seals, it won't matter, since taking the camshaft out will close all of the valves anyway.
 

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to each their own but if you have a good running motor why do all the extra work when 15 minutes in the parking lot works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Actually sounds complicated. I suppose nothing really is with engines.
 

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91 Daytona Shelby 5Spd 2.5 T1, 85 New Yorker 2.2 T1, 89 LeBaron Convertible 2.5 T1, Many spare parts
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I've done timing chains on a Nissan Quest (it has three) with the engine in the vehicle. A complete rebuild of the engine and turbo on one of these cars took me a fraction of the time and tools. (-: Notice how many of us responded and spouted out from memory how to do the job. The key with these engines is that nothing is too complicated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've done timing chains on a Nissan Quest (it has three) with the engine in the vehicle. A complete rebuild of the engine and turbo on one of these cars took me a fraction of the time and tools. (-: Notice how many of us responded and spouted out from memory how to do the job. The key with these engines is that nothing is too complicated.
I just have this fear of doing something wrong or messing something up so horribly that the car will be beyond repair lol perhaps a bit irrational. I do have a 1988 shadow es with 216k miles and a rusty bottom. I've been considering taking the tags off of it and using it as a practice car. If lumber prices ever come down enough to build a garage....

For now I should just pay my mechanic to do all this work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
to each their own but if you have a good running motor why do all the extra work when 15 minutes in the parking lot works.
Motor works fine. If it was an easy job I was just going to go ahead and do it for the performance upgrade. Since i already have the parts
 

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Motor works fine. If it was an easy job I was just going to go ahead and do it for the performance upgrade. Since i already have the parts
That reply wasn't directed at you. It is easy if you just follow my procedure. I replaced mine because the stockers weren't opening the valves fully at the track if I revved it over 4500rpms. After the swap I'd go fastest shifting between 6 and 6500rpms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That reply wasn't directed at you. It is easy if you just follow my procedure. I replaced mine because the stockers weren't opening the valves fully at the track if I revved it over 4500rpms. After the swap I'd go fastest shifting between 6 and 6500rpms.
I may try this out on my 88 first. It's become just a parts Car. Taking the tags off and focusing on the other cars.
 
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