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90 daytona 2.5 turbo

custom tubular exhaust manifold installed

space is tight around the turbo with the exhaust manifold. i believe I have heat shielding material that will protect delicate things (power steering pump, starter), but I think its prudent to direct as much fresh as air possible to the area between the head and firewall to help cool things...im wondering:

1- how did the lebaron hood vents work, and DID they work? were they intended to cool? why do they have that funny scoop under the hood?

2- what about cutting a hole in the hood, putting a big scoop to the side and simply making a angled piece of metal inside that directs air to the exhaust manifold?

3- or, what about a dryer-crinkle-tube going from the front bumper to that area?
 

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The hood vents draw air out of the under- hood area unlike a scoop that draws air in... The funny scoop on the underside is a water drip tray... If keeps water from dripping on the engine.
Drawing air into the under hood area may cool a little but it may have a negative effect on downforce at higher speed. Causing the front end to lift do to increased air under vehicle... Most older cars with big scoops channeled all that air directly into the carb then not causing to much air under the car...
 

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somebody that gets it. Nice to see.

A Lebaron GTS H body vent fits nicely off to the passenger side slightly between the bracing under hood if you're good at body work.

Also that scoop that's bolted to the kframe scoops air up and throws it a the turbo area.
 

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You may remove all the rubber weather stripping and engine compartment seal and also the plastic cover of the wiper and motor that will cool things down.
 

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Do NOT remove the rubber seal at the back of the hood! You want that there to prevent high pressure air from getting into the engine compartment.
 

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more important it keeps fumes and smoke from entering the cabin through the cowel plenium where the vents and heater a/c box draws air from
 

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Duh,why didn't I think of that...
 

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The metal with rubber deflector that bolts to the K-frame. Would making it larger and wider perhaps help direct more to help cool the turbo or would this also create other unwanted issues? Is the header stainless? If it is stainless could you wrap it in heat wrap or would that cause too much heat and would the header fail?
 

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If you haven't done it yet, you might want to consider having the exhaust parts coated with one of the ceramic heat coatings like Jet Hot. These help keep the heat in the exhaust. It does help a lot, but it isn't super cheap.
 

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only under 25-35MPH, above that the high pressure air at the base of the window will charge the engine bay with pressure.
I cannot grasp the concept of High pressure at the engine bay when the aerodynamics are sucking air from under the hood towards the windshield slope and the top of the car?
 

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the windshield acts like a snowplow pushing it's way through the air

the faster it goes the deeper or heavier the heap at the bottom of the windshield
 

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I cannot grasp the concept of High pressure at the engine bay when the aerodynamics are sucking air from under the hood towards the windshield slope and the top of the car?
Johnny, If I could cancel all the wind tunnel aerodynamic studies and design and go back to the early 1900 windshield design I would agree 100% with your snowplow logic.
The air goes over the hood and the angle of attach is much larger than a "snowplow", thus forcing it self over the windshield to the top of the car, forcing the car to stick on the road like a spoiler. The pressure is on top of the hood and not under the hood. So the Idea of the air turning around and getting under the hood on the windshield side is physically impossible. Otherwise we would have 2 miles per gallon fuel consumption on our cars and any car in that respect. Actually the pressure under the hood comes from the bottom of the car hence some engine bay vents on the side in high end Italian design sports cars.
 

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when you open the vent in the dash - why do you think there is a breeze in the car
- THAT's the high preassure air coming from the cowel

it can only occur if the air is collecting at the base of the windshield

I'm not saying the air dosen't pass up and over the roof but there is an area at the base of the windshield where it builds up before it goes over

remember on the surfaces there is a boundery area of air that is slow or non moveing approx an inch thick - that's why the snorkels on a challenger T/A hood are raised above the surface
 

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Yes the cowl area of the hood has pressure. I can see this too when my daytona shelby hood is wet and I have that hump in the hood. Well when it's wet the water will blow off the hood except the cowl area right behind thd hood bulge and even on the highway it will sit there pushed down by the pressure/downforce. So I've seen this in real life.
 

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when you open the vent in the dash - why do you think there is a breeze in the car
- THAT's the high preassure air coming from the cowel

it can only occur if the air is collecting at the base of the windshield

I'm not saying the air dosen't pass up and over the roof but there is an area at the base of the windshield where it builds up before it goes over

remember on the surfaces there is a boundery area of air that is slow or non moveing approx an inch thick - that's why the snorkels on a challenger T/A hood are raised above the surface
What can I say, you are absolutely right!
 
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