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Team,
Really enjoyed reading this post and your comments since you all raise excellent points. As I reflect I remember a time in 1985 when I bought a 1972 Satellite Sebring Plus with no engine and a 4-speed for $1,000! I rebuilt the car with a 440 and it was ready to drive by 1987. I worked 3-11pm every night after school and saved for every part I needed. During that time I also found a 1986 Plymouth Laser XE with a digital dash, 5-speed, and a turbo 1 motor out in a farmers field. I found the owner and bought the car for $500... the timing belt was shredded and some of the back interior was missing (something to do with the car being involved in drug running...) but I fixed up that car and between myself, my Dad, and even my sister we logged over 300,000 miles on that car.

That Satellite and Laser were the beginnings of a passion and hobby that has led to me owning 100s of Mopars to include a 426 stroker 6-speed convertible 2010 SRT Challenger, 2-3x 2007 SRT8 Jeeps, 2-3x 2011-19 SRT Jeeps to include a Trackhawk, 2-3 SRT10s, 2x 6-speed Challenger Hellcats, 8-10x Daytonas, and even a very rare 69 RT/SE track pac 440 4-speed Charger!!

I say all this to say... in 1985 no one gave a hoot about 1972 Satellites or even 1969 Chargers, but now these are revered and big dollar cars. We have passed through a long dark period with these turbo Dodges and yes they may lack some of the lure to the die hard V8 RWD muscle car fans, but... one I'm working hard to make that an option (see RWD conversion posts), two the support and following I've witnessed over these cars for the last 30 years is impressive so don't quit when the finish line is ahead, three everything goes in cycles; some generations may not be into cars, but the following generations are, just log into YouTube and start searching car topics... video is the new forum, and lastly we can't pack up our toys and go home because we are now the ones who'll introduce or in some cases reintroduce these great cars to past and future wrench turners!

Memories, memories are what make these cars and this hobby great. Keep the faith since you're the torch bearers... remember every conversation has a sender and a receiver, to keep these cars relevant we need to get these cars and conversations into places they can be seen and heard.

Appreciate you all, best wishes and happy new year
Tom
allardfabrications.com

What makes you think that in 1985 nobody "gave a hoot" about satellites or Chargers? Do you think it has to do with the fact that Japanese ecoboxes were more popular? I do agree that the 80s weren't the best time for TD cars but don't forget that the GLH Omni was a success. I love Mopar muscle but I'm crazy over GLH Omnis.
 

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Kinarthurlambo,

Good question about "gave a hoot", long response so thank you in advance for the opportunity and I hope it spurs some thoughts with those that are reading.
What I meant was 60-70s cars were cheap in the 80-90s. For a lot reasons I'm sure, but in general cars that are 10-15 years old have usually fully depreciated. Just look at a 2002 Grand Cherokee Overland, $40,000 vehicle in 2002, now can be had for $1000-$3000 depending on condition. Another great example is the 2006 Magnum and Charger. The Magnums are significantly less than Chargers due to popularity and duration of production, but both are significantly cheaper than when new and these cars are only 14 years old. I saw a 2008 SRT8 Charger the other day with clean title, but high mileage for $7,000.
Basically I'm trying to say it just takes time for cool cars to become sought after cars and depending on what the car originally cost has some impact on when they fully depreciate. There seems to be a process to what makes a desirable car sought after, meaning once all the rare ones are acquired, then the semi rare ones to basic ones follow, and ultimately when are those are untouchable the next newer generation / body style becomes the "target". Lastly, the "value" of a car is also on a sliding scale, since capitalistic economies go up... during their time periods a really cool 70s muscle car generally cost you $4,000, a really cool 80s muscle car generally cost you $25,000, today a really cool muscle car generally cost $90,000+ (think redeye).
Chargers are a good example of this, the 70s Chargers are starting to get expensive now that all the second generation Chargers are so darn expensive. Chargers are also a good example because the first generation never seemed to gain favor, although now they are increasing in value, for a long time that was not the case. This is important because what it means to us is all cars eventually gain desirable status; however their popularity has a lot to do with how long that takes. In our case we do run the risk of being skipped over and or delayed in gaining desirable status because we may run into a situation where the market jumps from 70s cars to 2000s due to the V8 RWD bias... The last point I'll bring up regarding Chargers as an example is modernization. My 69 Charger is a beautiful car, iconic some might say, but in restored condition todays average minivan can out brake, corner, and accelerate my 50 year old car. I'm seeing it in the market values. The big dollars are in the holy grail untouched low mileage numbers matching original cars and the resto-mod cars. I think resto-mods are gaining favor since most folks want the classic looks, but want the modern performance. I think this applies to our cars in the sense that we have to be prepared for a future in which our cars are sought after to be converted using modern engines and suspensions. So if you have IROC RT or Shelby Turbo II or IV I'd leave those cars be; however my ES is and was a prefect candidate to convert to RWD using a new hemi, big brakes, and great suspension.
So... since our 80s muscle cars have fully depreciated, the basic question is, are they desirable? I still think yes... especially the rare ones like the IROC RT etc. For the not so rare ones, an entire generation grew up with front wheel drive cars being the new normal and a entire generation is currently growing up with turbos and superchargers being the norm. What we have is cars that are affordable, easy to work on and were cool before turbos and front wheel drive was cool! That is also why it is more important than ever for us to keep these cars in circulation!
Appreciate the opportunity to clarify, I'm passionate about cars and optimistic that younger and older versions of me out there will find our cars cool.

Best wishes
Tom
 

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Kinarthurlambo,

Good question about "gave a hoot", long response so thank you in advance for the opportunity and I hope it spurs some thoughts with those that are reading.
What I meant was 60-70s cars were cheap in the 80-90s. For a lot reasons I'm sure, but in general cars that are 10-15 years old have usually fully depreciated. Just look at a 2002 Grand Cherokee Overland, $40,000 vehicle in 2002, now can be had for $1000-$3000 depending on condition. Another great example is the 2006 Magnum and Charger. The Magnums are significantly less than Chargers due to popularity and duration of production, but both are significantly cheaper than when new and these cars are only 14 years old. I saw a 2008 SRT8 Charger the other day with clean title, but high mileage for $7,000.
Basically I'm trying to say it just takes time for cool cars to become sought after cars and depending on what the car originally cost has some impact on when they fully depreciate. There seems to be a process to what makes a desirable car sought after, meaning once all the rare ones are acquired, then the semi rare ones to basic ones follow, and ultimately when are those are untouchable the next newer generation / body style becomes the "target". Lastly, the "value" of a car is also on a sliding scale, since capitalistic economies go up... during their time periods a really cool 70s muscle car generally cost you $4,000, a really cool 80s muscle car generally cost you $25,000, today a really cool muscle car generally cost $90,000+ (think redeye).
Chargers are a good example of this, the 70s Chargers are starting to get expensive now that all the second generation Chargers are so darn expensive. Chargers are also a good example because the first generation never seemed to gain favor, although now they are increasing in value, for a long time that was not the case. This is important because what it means to us is all cars eventually gain desirable status; however their popularity has a lot to do with how long that takes. In our case we do run the risk of being skipped over and or delayed in gaining desirable status because we may run into a situation where the market jumps from 70s cars to 2000s due to the V8 RWD bias... The last point I'll bring up regarding Chargers as an example is modernization. My 69 Charger is a beautiful car, iconic some might say, but in restored condition todays average minivan can out brake, corner, and accelerate my 50 year old car. I'm seeing it in the market values. The big dollars are in the holy grail untouched low mileage numbers matching original cars and the resto-mod cars. I think resto-mods are gaining favor since most folks want the classic looks, but want the modern performance. I think this applies to our cars in the sense that we have to be prepared for a future in which our cars are sought after to be converted using modern engines and suspensions. So if you have IROC RT or Shelby Turbo II or IV I'd leave those cars be; however my ES is and was a prefect candidate to convert to RWD using a new hemi, big brakes, and great suspension.
So... since our 80s muscle cars have fully depreciated, the basic question is, are they desirable? I still think yes... especially the rare ones like the IROC RT etc. For the not so rare ones, an entire generation grew up with front wheel drive cars being the new normal and a entire generation is currently growing up with turbos and superchargers being the norm. What we have is cars that are affordable, easy to work on and were cool before turbos and front wheel drive was cool! That is also why it is more important than ever for us to keep these cars in circulation!
Appreciate the opportunity to clarify, I'm passionate about cars and optimistic that younger and older versions of me out there will find our cars cool.

Best wishes
Tom
Thanks dude!!

I got an 86 Plymouth Horizon that me and my dad are gonna modify as a GLH. My car will not be getting the 2.2 turbo because I'm 21 and don't have as much experience as you do. My Horizon was built originally to take on Japanese cars like Hondas and Toyotas and as every Mopar guy knows, 84-86 was when they made the Turbo Omnis as a sporty option.

My car got upgraded to fuel injection and now has 2.5 fuel injected engine from an 89 Dodge Aries. Gets way better fuel economy and makes less pollution than it did originally. What we are doing is still keeping it as an import fighter only that it'll look like a GLH.
 

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Thanks dude!!

I got an 86 Plymouth Horizon that me and my dad are gonna modify as a GLH. My car will not be getting the 2.2 turbo because I'm 21 and don't have as much experience as you do. My Horizon was built originally to take on Japanese cars like Hondas and Toyotas and as every Mopar guy knows, 84-86 was when they made the Turbo Omnis as a sporty option.

My car got upgraded to fuel injection and now has 2.5 fuel injected engine from an 89 Dodge Aries. Gets way better fuel economy and makes less pollution than it did originally. What we are doing is still keeping it as an import fighter only that it'll look like a GLH. I got a photo of what my car will look like roughly if you are interested.
 

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Just out of curiosity, can somebody tell me if the GLH Omni falls under the category of muscle car or tuner? I'm not sure what category my Horizon would fall under since it'll be a fake GLH.
 

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Hello everyone, I am from Ukraine!
I own the 1989 Dodge Dayton. It's a childhood dream.
We have such cars are very rare and practical parts are nowhere to be found and it saddens.
Because of this, I was forced to install the engine from another car, and my choice fell on the 3.2-liter Honda engine.
 

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Hello everyone, I am from Ukraine!
I own the 1989 Dodge Dayton. It's a childhood dream.
We have such cars are very rare and practical parts are nowhere to be found and it saddens.
Because of this, I was forced to install the engine from another car, and my choice fell on the 3.2-liter Honda engine.
Welcome brother!!

I understand bro, don't sweat it. You did what you had to. How come parts for American cars are just about impossible to get in Ukraine?
 

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Welcome brother!!

I understand bro, don't sweat it. You did what you had to. How come parts for American cars are just about impossible to get in Ukraine?
Spare parts for cars of the American market from 2000 to 2019 without problems.
With old cars, everything is much worse, if something is, then it costs a lot of money
 

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Spare parts for cars of the American market from 2000 to 2019 without problems.
With old cars, everything is much worse, if something is, then it costs a lot of money
Oh OK gotcha. Sorry to hear that man, can you tell me why it's easier to get parts for the newer stuff but not so easy for the older stuff? Does it have to do with government regulations or what?
 

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It may also be a lot of shelved projects. Between hours worked, life, etc.
It's taken me 5+ years to get to the point of just putting the engine back in my car. . .
What I have noticed is in that period of time parts have gotten way more scarce.

I think this may be a transition point for the cars as well - I don't see many 80's Dodges around town that are people I don't know. But by the same token, that goes for 80's Fords, Chevrolets, etc. They seem to be at the point where they are no longer everyday drivers and a weekend / car show vehicle.

As for the hobby as a whole, I think it is dying - younger people aren't interested in a car for anything much more than an appliance.

Unrelated to the topic, phone use is an interesting observation. We have a 20 year old at work now that doesn't know how to use a regular computer for tasks, but can use a phone with no problem. He can't even use hotkeys. . .
I'm 21 and I love Turbo Dodges just like you do, in fact my first car is gonna be an 86 Plymouth Horizon modified as a GLH Omni and turbo Omnis are my addiction. I see turbo Dodges as way more than some appliance like you put it, I am not most people my age I love getting dirty with my dad working on stuff in the garage and I don't waste my time shopping for clothes or whatever.

Yesterday I got to work on my Horizon with my dad and I loved it, a lot of people my age would see that as "dirty labor" but not to me it's my hobby and I love doing it. I have also done bodywork on my dad's 84 Dodge Aries and it was great. My dad is showing me how to do these kinds of things myself, a lot of people my age wouldn't know which end of a power wrench to hold or how to take wheels off. I am proud to say that yesterday was the very first time I got to work with a power wrench and help take off the wheel bearing.
 

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I'm in the same method of thought

My 20 year old son want's nothing to do with cars. He doesn't even want his license. My 30 year old SIL refuses to get one also

My 21 year old nephew looks at it for transportation and has me or a shop do anything to the car
I'm 21 and I love Turbo Dodges just like you do, in fact my first car is gonna be an 86 Plymouth Horizon modified as a GLH Omni and turbo Omnis are my addiction. I see turbo Dodges as way more than some appliance like you put it, I am not most people my age I love getting dirty with my dad working on stuff in the garage and I don't waste my time shopping for clothes or whatever.

Yesterday I got to work on my Horizon with my dad and I loved it, a lot of people my age would see that as "dirty labor" but not to me it's my hobby and I love doing it. I have also done bodywork on my dad's 84 Dodge Aries and it was great. My dad is showing me how to do these kinds of things myself, a lot of people my age wouldn't know which end of a power wrench to hold or how to take wheels off. I am proud to say that yesterday was the very first time I got to work with a power wrench and help take off the wheel bearing.
 

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Oh OK gotcha. Sorry to hear that man, can you tell me why it's easier to get parts for the newer stuff but not so easy for the older stuff? Does it have to do with government regulations or what?
New cars are imported into our country. Naturally, we have dealerships and shops for these cars.
Cars 1980 -1990 did not start for us.
For example, in my country there are no more than ten Dodge Daytonа Shelby.
 

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New cars are imported into our country. Naturally, we have dealerships and shops for these cars.
Cars 1980 -1990 did not start for us.
For example, in my country there are no more than ten Dodge Daytonа Shelby.
Ohhhhhhhh.

I don't suppose you know what a Dodge Omni is by any chance?
 

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New cars are imported into our country. Naturally, we have dealerships and shops for these cars.
Cars 1980 -1990 did not start for us.
For example, in my country there are no more than ten Dodge Daytonа Shelby.
How strict is the Ukra
I know this car, but we don't have one
I see. Well I own one of these but it's a Plymouth Horizon but it's exactly the same as a Dodge Omni.

As every car guy knows, 1973 was when the oil crisis plagued the United States and as a result Americans turned to Japanese cars due to their fuel efficiency and high quality. It took a while for the Detroit big three to catch up but they did especially Chrysler.

This car was introduced in the late 70s by Chrysler motors in an attempt to compete with Japanese cars and it sort of worked (the Dodge Aries K and Plymouth Reliant did a way better job of taking on Japanese imports). In 1984, they made a turbo version of this car known as the GLH (goes like hell), 85 they made the GLH-T (Goes like hell with a turbo) and in 86 was when the real hot rod Omni was launched the Shelby GLHS (Goes like hell s'more) but they made only 500 of these in the USA. The Shelby version was sold only at Dodge dealers that signed up for Shelby franchises.

My car is not the turbo version, mine is the non-turbo version. My dad took the carb out of the thing and stuck a fuel injected 2.5 4 cyl engine out of an 89 Dodge Aries and the results are better fuel economy and lower emissions. He and I are gonna modify my car to look like a GLH but we won't drop the turbo.
 

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I'm in the same method of thought

My 20 year old son want's nothing to do with cars. He doesn't even want his license. My 30 year old SIL refuses to get one also

My 21 year old nephew looks at it for transportation and has me or a shop do anything to the car
Hey it's me again. Remember the Omni I mentioned in my post?

Here is a photo of what my car is gonna look like after restoration, please tell me what you think and what I should do differently. Keep in mind that this is just a rough idea of what it'll look like:
269762


269763
 

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Well, like the title says. I would like to hear other members thoughts on whether our TD hobby is dying? I never see any on the road in the northern WV, Pittsburgh, PA area. Also, when I visit this website I see many posts with zero replies, even when asking for help/guidance. I am 54 y.o. and have been playing with these cars for about 25 years but it might be time to move on. The younger generations are into the "tuner car" scene and with the current high performance musclecars available our cars are being forgotten.
I'm 21 and part of the younger generation and I'm crazy over turbo Omnis, if you really wanna get technical tuners are cars like the Nissan Skyline GTR R34 (illegal on American soil so don't bother importing one because the feds will seize it from you) and the Honda Integra Type R (Acura RSX for the American market). These kinds of cars are known as JDMs (Japanese domestic market). Don't get me wrong, I'm still a Mopar guy I just happen to know Japanese cars too because I used to love them once. The only Japanese car I like is the Acura RSX and that's it.

I got an 86 Plymouth Horizon that I'm gonna flip into a fake copy of a GLH later this year, would you consider that a muscle car or a tuner? That's gonna be my hot rod.
 

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Kinarthurlambo,

Good question about "gave a hoot", long response so thank you in advance for the opportunity and I hope it spurs some thoughts with those that are reading.
What I meant was 60-70s cars were cheap in the 80-90s. For a lot reasons I'm sure, but in general cars that are 10-15 years old have usually fully depreciated. Just look at a 2002 Grand Cherokee Overland, $40,000 vehicle in 2002, now can be had for $1000-$3000 depending on condition. Another great example is the 2006 Magnum and Charger. The Magnums are significantly less than Chargers due to popularity and duration of production, but both are significantly cheaper than when new and these cars are only 14 years old. I saw a 2008 SRT8 Charger the other day with clean title, but high mileage for $7,000.
Basically I'm trying to say it just takes time for cool cars to become sought after cars and depending on what the car originally cost has some impact on when they fully depreciate. There seems to be a process to what makes a desirable car sought after, meaning once all the rare ones are acquired, then the semi rare ones to basic ones follow, and ultimately when are those are untouchable the next newer generation / body style becomes the "target". Lastly, the "value" of a car is also on a sliding scale, since capitalistic economies go up... during their time periods a really cool 70s muscle car generally cost you $4,000, a really cool 80s muscle car generally cost you $25,000, today a really cool muscle car generally cost $90,000+ (think redeye).
Chargers are a good example of this, the 70s Chargers are starting to get expensive now that all the second generation Chargers are so darn expensive. Chargers are also a good example because the first generation never seemed to gain favor, although now they are increasing in value, for a long time that was not the case. This is important because what it means to us is all cars eventually gain desirable status; however their popularity has a lot to do with how long that takes. In our case we do run the risk of being skipped over and or delayed in gaining desirable status because we may run into a situation where the market jumps from 70s cars to 2000s due to the V8 RWD bias... The last point I'll bring up regarding Chargers as an example is modernization. My 69 Charger is a beautiful car, iconic some might say, but in restored condition todays average minivan can out brake, corner, and accelerate my 50 year old car. I'm seeing it in the market values. The big dollars are in the holy grail untouched low mileage numbers matching original cars and the resto-mod cars. I think resto-mods are gaining favor since most folks want the classic looks, but want the modern performance. I think this applies to our cars in the sense that we have to be prepared for a future in which our cars are sought after to be converted using modern engines and suspensions. So if you have IROC RT or Shelby Turbo II or IV I'd leave those cars be; however my ES is and was a prefect candidate to convert to RWD using a new hemi, big brakes, and great suspension.
So... since our 80s muscle cars have fully depreciated, the basic question is, are they desirable? I still think yes... especially the rare ones like the IROC RT etc. For the not so rare ones, an entire generation grew up with front wheel drive cars being the new normal and a entire generation is currently growing up with turbos and superchargers being the norm. What we have is cars that are affordable, easy to work on and were cool before turbos and front wheel drive was cool! That is also why it is more important than ever for us to keep these cars in circulation!
Appreciate the opportunity to clarify, I'm passionate about cars and optimistic that younger and older versions of me out there will find our cars cool.

Best wishes
Tom
Hey it's me kingarthurlambo, you wanna see a photo of what my Omni is gonna look like after restoration?
 

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I know, this is just a rough idea of what it'll look like. This is to give an idea of what to expect. The rims are gonna be from a Dodge Neon SXT (7 spokes) and the stripe is gonna be from a Shelby Charger. Other than that pretty much like this.
Right on man, and welcome to the forum. Although i'm still not too old, 33 now, you sound similar to me at 20, keep at it, working on your own rig, idea, dream is extremely rewarding. My dream back in my teens was actually a modified turbo Dodge Aries K-car, which I just over the past year got to work into reality. You'll be able to to get a 86 GLHS, but I do recommend maybe looking into finding a rough one soon, the prices for those cars, in good condition are sadly going through the roof!

By the way, you have blown my mind, the Shelby Charger skunk stripe and stripe/gfx side scheme sounds like an awesome idea tailored to an Omni!!!!!!
 

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Right on man, and welcome to the forum. Although i'm still not too old, 33 now, you sound similar to me at 20, keep at it, working on your own rig, idea, dream is extremely rewarding. My dream back in my teens was actually a modified turbo Dodge Aries K-car, which I just over the past year got to work into reality. You'll be able to to get a 86 GLHS, but I do recommend maybe looking into finding a rough one soon, the prices for those cars, in good condition are sadly going through the roof!

By the way, you have blown my mind, the Shelby Charger skunk stripe and stripe/gfx side scheme sounds like an awesome idea tailored to an Omni!!!!!!
Thanks bro, FYI it was my dad's idea with the Shelby stripe so the credit goes to him. I so can't believe that I'm getting a hot car at 21 I never thought this would happen to me in a million years but it is. This will be my graduation present in a few months. Wait until you see the real thing restored, it will completely blow your mind. FYI, this Omni isn't the cool car that my dad has, he also has a 64 Valiant station wagon that we may pull out of his garage later this summer (this wagon goes back to his childhood) and believe it or not we got an 84 Dodge Aries K that I did some bodywork on.

I have been looking for a GLHS ever since I learned about it but all the ones I found were $5000 on Craigslist, can I ask why you think that I'll get an 86 GLHS since they made only 500 of them?
 
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