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This question is for turbo master minds or technicians... im new to turbos. Know very very little and was thinking of all different oils that lubricate the bearings and was wondering. Would power steering fluid lubricate the turbo too? Just trying to learn not actually going to do so. If it would work, and properly lubricate the turbo, would it have to be a thick viscosity? Just trying to learn more and more of the different things about everything i can lol im only 20 years old so the more i learn the longer i have to learn more and figured i could start here
 

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Welcome To TD!!!

Power Steering fluid is a Hydraulic Fluid, not a Lubricant.
The biggest issues with keeping a turbo lubricated are time and heat.
Time meaning how long on a cold startup before oil actually flows to the turbo.
(Will also affect Camshaft Lubrication)
The turbo gets extremely hot and could spin in upwards of 100,000 RPM's.

The best ways to combat both of these issues is by using Synthetic Motor Oil.
Synthetics are not affected by temperature so they will flow quickly in extreme cold weather and maintain there lubricating ability under extreme pressure/heat.

The other problems that arise are from heat soak after shutting the car off.
Engine and engine components see a rise in temperature after shutdown due to heat still being present but no cooling taking place, this is especially true in the turbo.
Synthetic oils have a minute carbon footprint and can maintain their original state under extreme heat so there is virtually no chance of "coking".

From Exxon/Mobil...
"Coke is the solid residue created when oil undergoes severe oxidative and thermal breakdown at extreme engine temperatures. The higher the temperature, the harder, blacker and more brittle the coke/deposit residue"

One of the things you must do with a turbo car is allow the turbo to cool down before shutting the engine off.
Before shutting the engine off allow the car to idle for 30 seconds to 1 minute, this allows the turbo to dissipate excess heat.
Depending on how hard you drove the car and what ambient temps are will determine how much cool down time you need.
Chrysler helps this situation by Water Cooling the turbo.
Since my car was new I have always allowed the car to idle for a minimum of 1 minute and if the cooling fan cycles on I will not shut the car off until the fan cycles off so I know coolant temp is at its lowest spec temp.

Before you ask, Mobil 1 is my oil of choice and I have been using it religiously since 1988.
I refuse to get into any debates on motor oils and which may or may not be the best.

(6)Turbo Cool Down Time.jpg
 

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Same here also.
I've been using Mobil 1 5W-30 since around 1983.
What NAJ said about cool down too.
If you've ever seen a cherry red turbo, you'll understand the importance of a cool down.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Welcome To TD!!!

Power Steering fluid is a Hydraulic Fluid, not a Lubricant.
The biggest issues with keeping a turbo lubricated are time and heat.
Time meaning how long on a cold startup before oil actually flows to the turbo.
(Will also affect Camshaft Lubrication)
The turbo gets extremely hot and could spin in upwards of 100,000 RPM's.

The best ways to combat both of these issues is by using Synthetic Motor Oil.
Synthetics are not affected by temperature so they will flow quickly in extreme cold weather and maintain there lubricating ability under extreme pressure/heat.

The other problems that arise are from heat soak after shutting the car off.
Engine and engine components see a rise in temperature after shutdown due to heat still being present but no cooling taking place, this is especially true in the turbo.
Synthetic oils have a minute carbon footprint and can maintain their original state under extreme heat so there is virtually no chance of "coking".

From Exxon/Mobil...
"Coke is the solid residue created when oil undergoes severe oxidative and thermal breakdown at extreme engine temperatures. The higher the temperature, the harder, blacker and more brittle the coke/deposit residue"

One of the things you must do with a turbo car is allow the turbo to cool down before shutting the engine off.
Before shutting the engine off allow the car to idle for 30 seconds to 1 minute, this allows the turbo to dissipate excess heat.
Depending on how hard you drove the car and what ambient temps are will determine how much cool down time you need.
Chrysler helps this situation by Water Cooling the turbo.
Since my car was new I have always allowed the car to idle for a minimum of 1 minute and if the cooling fan cycles on I will not shut the car off until the fan cycles off so I know coolant temp is at its lowest spec temp.

Before you ask, Mobil 1 is my oil of choice and I have been using it religiously since 1988.
I refuse to get into any debates on motor oils and which may or may not be the best.

View attachment 272692
Thank you! As stated im learning and i really appreciate people that teach instead of call me stupid. So the reason i want to learn about turbos is because i have a 349 stroker in my 98 ram 1500 with a camshaft with specs good for forced induction and got an idea for it. But dont want to make that step yet because idk all the limits a turbo has. Which led to asking that question. Thank you for taking your time to answer my question! And im happy to be here
 

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To echo what NAJ said, a few years back I was at the Chrysler Carlisle event in July. We had a retired Chrysler tech (test-stand) guy come to speak with our group. Turns out he was on the development team for the turbo 2.2s at Chrysler back in the day. I talked to him for a while because I wanted to know his recommendations for how to best care for the setup. Basically, I asked what one thing I can do to keep the turbo healthy, and the guy said to let it cool down before shutting it off. I do exactly what NAJ mentioned. Sometimes I wait until the fan kicks on and let it cycle to off before shutting it off. Mobil-1 synthetic as well.

Good luck!
 

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Thank you! As stated im learning and i really appreciate people that teach instead of call me stupid. So the reason i want to learn about turbos is because i have a 349 stroker in my 98 ram 1500 with a camshaft with specs good for forced induction and got an idea for it. But dont want to make that step yet because idk all the limits a turbo has. Which led to asking that question. Thank you for taking your time to answer my question! And im happy to be here
Nobody is born knowing anything, everything we know is learned as we go along and grow.
I had many hours of training and learned from experience from working on cars for 40 years, I cannot take that knowledge with me so I have no issues passing it on to the younger generation.
Three things I was told from older/ wiser techs when I was learning...
1)The only "stupid" question is the one that is not asked.
2)It is easier to answer "silly/stupid" questions than it is to fix stupid mistakes.
3)The first time is an experience, the second time is a mistake.
 

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Nobody is born knowing anything, everything we know is learned as we go along and grow.
I had many hours of training and learned from experience from working on cars for 40 years, I cannot take that knowledge with me so I have no issues passing it on to the younger generation.
Three things I was told from older/ wiser techs when I was learning...
1)The only "stupid" question is the one that is not asked.
2)It is easier to answer "silly/stupid" questions than it is to fix stupid mistakes.
3)The first time is an experience, the second time is a mistake.
That's about the best interpretation, explanation, advice, and attitude that I have read.
Thank you again.
 

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some really expensive advice .. NEVER PUT CASTROL IN A TURBO MOTOR..
cost me six short block assemblies before I caught on to THAT...
 

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some really expensive advice .. NEVER PUT CASTROL IN A TURBO MOTOR..
cost me six short block assemblies before I caught on to THAT...
I tried using Castrol synthetic just before the trip to SDAC 5.
No oil pressure.
Immediately shut down the engine and drained the motor.
Took my other car to get Mobil 1 5W-30.
Problem solved.
When I was at the SDAC 5 Tech seminar a few days later, Dave Zelkowski (engine development engineer @ Chrysler),
said "never use Castrol Synthetic".
He's the guy who developed the Super 60 package.
 

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Funny story if you are old enough to remember Castrol's first commercial for Castrol Syntec back in 91.
They had two engines on stands running, one with Castrol Syntec and the other with Conventional motor oil.
They ran the engines (which had actual exposed cooling fans on them) for an extended period of time, shut the engines off and drained the oil from both.
After the oil was drained and not refilled they restarted the engines.
The engine with conventional motor oil soon siezed while the one that had Syntec in it kept running.
I called BULLS**T!!!
During a slow day at work back in 91 we decided to call Castrol and question their commercial. (This was long before the internet, we got the phone # from 411).
When they answered we asked for customer service and when connected we said we saw their commercial and had a couple of questions.
1) What were your results when tested against Mobil 1?
2)What did OSHA say about the two lab techs standing right in front of running engines with no protection around the spinning fans or a partition keeping the techs from getting too close?

They hung up on us.
 

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late 80's early 90's .. using castrol non-synthetic oil..in my cryco 2.2 turbo motors

I tried 5w-30 , 10w-30 and 20/50 , all with the same result

I could not get an oil level reading off the dipstick once up at operating temp..'cause the ####ing oil would NOT cling to the dipstick..
had lots of oil pressure

lost the rod bearings in 6 motors

I switched to Q state non synthetic '93-'94 and I haven't lost an engine since
and I don't treat them particularly nicely...

as for needing synthetic oil..
"..PLEASE"....

had a 95 grand marquis.. 4.6 with a leaky oil pan at about the three iter point..drove it for ten years .. topped up with q state
NEVER DID AN OIL CHANGE.. EVER..

ran fine.. had 580 000 KM when I sent it to the wrecker for no reason other than simply not needing it any more

my current f150 routinely goes 17000-20 odd KM between oil changes..
has got 370 000 km
most of that WAS highway.. back in the day

regular old Q state dino oil to boot..

oh yeah .. kinda "retired" .. almost every trip out is short / local and barely beyond a total engine warm up.. at least so in winter ..thus it's running in cold enrichment "mode" a lot of that time too..

oh yeah .. dono if it's the oil .. Q state .. but my nineteen year old , never been apart, 5.4 - F150 .. don't dip ..ever either..

selling me on something else just ain't gonna happen
 

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lol
good thing I think of it ^
I SHOULD change the oil IN my truck
.. this week

..before it gets to cold ..
and I don't
 

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Funny story if you are old enough to remember Castrol's first commercial for Castrol Syntec back in 91.
They had two engines on stands running, one with Castrol Syntec and the other with Conventional motor oil.
They ran the engines (which had actual exposed cooling fans on them) for an extended period of time, shut the engines off and drained the oil from both.
After the oil was drained and not refilled they restarted the engines.
The engine with conventional motor oil soon siezed while the one that had Syntec in it kept running.
I called BULLS**T!!!
During a slow day at work back in 91 we decided to call Castrol and question their commercial. (This was long before the internet, we got the phone # from 411).
When they answered we asked for customer service and when connected we said we saw their commercial and had a couple of questions.
1) What were your results when tested against Mobil 1?
2)What did OSHA say about the two lab techs standing right in front of running engines with no protection around the spinning fans or a partition keeping the techs from getting too close?

They hung up on us.
LOL!!!
That's the oil I tried....Syntec
I remember that commercial.
 

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My God no kidding right? I tell people that and they think I'm nuts. Castrol is the worst oil I've ever used.

Valvoline and Pennzoil have been some of the best I've used. Had mixed results with Mobil 1 synthetic.

some really expensive advice .. NEVER PUT CASTROL IN A TURBO MOTOR..
cost me six short block assemblies before I caught on to THAT...
 

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Yes, both Penzoil and Valvoline conventional oils are excellent.
Back in the 70's I used to use Castrol GTX 20W-50 and found out how sludge is Not an engines best friend.
 
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