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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all, so I'm having some dipstick issues on my 2.2 common block, and I thought I would ask some people who know more about these engines than I do. I recently had to change the oil pan gasket on my 1990 Plymouth Sundance (the dodge shadow's twin), and at some point my dipstick tube decided to fall out. After some research I found that it needed to be pressed in, and after trying for a while, I couldn't get it back in. So, I decided to grind the tube down so that it would fit in the block, and thought I would use RTV to seal it up. And after getting it back in, I noticed that it didn't read right anymore, despite being in the exact same position that it was before. I looked at some images of my engine on the Chrysler 2.2 wiki, and the dipstick shown there is in the exact same position as mine. I only have to put about 2 quarts in it for it to read full. I know there are multiple different dipsticks and tubes, my dipstick is a model 4536071, And my pan is the 4 quart "deep well" with the hump on the bottom. If anyone has any ideas I'd appreciate hearing them.
272098
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Welcome To TD!!!

It is common for the dipstick tube to break.
My suggestion would be to drain the oil and add 4 qts, then you know the oil level is correct.

If this is a 89 - 95 2.2L/2.5L (except 16 Valve Turbo) the dipstick tube # is 4387575 and apparently it is still available.


 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks! and I don't believe it broke, because the end was flat and didn't look broken. seems like it miraculously fell out some how. And when I went to put it back in, it seemed like the tube was the same size as the hole in the block, so it was impossible to put back in. That's why I cut part of it and grinded the rest to make the lip on the tube sit flush against the block. I had to put the oil pan on twice (didn't seal the first time) and with an empty pan, it only took about 2 1/2 quarts before reading full. And considering the lip on the tube is against the block where it should be, and judging by how it matches the wiki, I don't understand how it could be wrong. It's a shame I cant find a picture of the tube anywhere to verify it.
 

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I would almost guarantee that it broke, but again without pics of a new one...
 

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4387575 is still available from any Mopar dealer

1987-95 most 2.2 applications

buy them before they go obsolete!!!!
 

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Definitely replace the tube with the one Marty and Jan mentioned.
you may want to replace the dipstick itself, just to be 100% sure.
I don't know what came on the 1990 common block turbo, but the dipstick in the picture is incorrect for 1981 through 1989.
Here's a picture of what dipstick came on the 1984-89 turbo cars:
272110
 

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His dipstick pic is identical to what is on my 90 Daytona.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the suggestions guys, now I know the kosher thing to do is to buy a new tube, but I had the idea of putting 4 quarts in it, and then cutting the stick and putting notches in it for my reading. I was very tempted to do that, but since the tube is still available, I might as well do it the right way. And since NAJ's stick is the same on his 90, I think I'll stick to the stick I have.
 

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Definitely replace the tube with the one Marty and Jan mentioned.
you may want to replace the dipstick itself, just to be 100% sure.
I don't know what came on the 1990 common block turbo, but the dipstick in the picture is incorrect for 1981 through 1989.
Here's a picture of what dipstick came on the 1984-89 turbo cars:
View attachment 272110
This is not exactly correct. All common block cars (1989 up) should have the plastic T handle style dipstick. The one exception are the early production Chrysler TCs from 89 which did not have common block engines. There are two lengths of the common block dipsticks, but the tube is the same between the 2.5 and 2.2. The dip stick the original poster has with the silver ring below the plastic handle is for the non balance shaft style oil pan (2.2tbi and 89 2.2 TII). If the dip stick has a black ring below the plastic handle it’s for the deep balance shaft style oil pan (2.5tbi and 2.5 TI). I’m not sure about the non common block cars with the ring style dip stick, but I suspect there are at least three different lengths with the two different oil pans and the 86-88 2.5tbi tall deck engines.
 

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My 2 cents,The tube broke off at the block or just below the surface of the block and part of the tube is still in the block. With out knowing it you probably cut the top end of the tube when you tried to re-install. You will probably have to push the old broken tube out the bottom side of the block. Yea the pan will probably have to come off. These tubes are a pain to reinstall. I have had to use sand paper to slowly sand and reduce the OD of the tube that needs to go back into the block.

Also the stud on the thermostat goose neck outlet is in wrong position. The new tube should have bracket when received and be installed on the left side of the thermostat outlet. see photo's.

272189
 

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I agree with everything stated above, the broken piece is probably still in the block.
The bracket on the dipstick tube should be straight.

Engine Compartment Front-2014.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It doesn't seem like there is anything lodged in there, although it did seem too small. I've already taken the pan off twice now, and that is the last thing I want to do. If it is stuck in there, is there anything stopping me from just knocking it into the pan? I could fish it out with a magnet through the drain hole. And if I do manage to get the thing in there I'll be sure to mount the bracket to the thermostat housing.
 

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If there is a broken piece still in the block you can try using...


Be careful using bolt extractors, if the piece you are attempting to remove is not moving do not apply "excessive" force or the bolt extractor will break, the extractors are hardened and cannot be drilled out.

Worse comes to worse and you are able to knock the broken piece out of the block and into the oil pan and cannot retrieve it, use a magnetic drain plug.

 

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Discussion Starter #14
eBay says my tube will arrive by the 16th. I'll probably try your extractor strategy first, and yeah those things don't like to come out after they're broken off. It might make it easier to beat in though, who knows. I think my current drain plug might be magnetic, not entirely sure though. My only fear from running the car with it in the pan (if I have to beat it in) is the possibility of it getting lodged in the lip on the oil pickup screen.
 

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You could use a center punch and gently tap it down into the hole.
That would dislodge any debris including any RTV you said you used as a sealer.
I know you don't want to do this again but, I'd recommend removing the oil pan one more time, clean it, and install the new tube before you re-install the pan.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I was going to use RTV, but I ended up not putting any on it. All I would have to worry about getting is the pan is a metal shard or two from the extractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yeah that's why I only use it when I have to or when I'm fed up with something. That's exactly why I don't want to remove the pan again; it didn't seal with the gasket, so I ditched the long pieces and just used the ends and RTV.
 

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I just removed a broken dipstick tube end.

They can be really tough to extract cleanly.

I pounded an awl into the block beside the broken tube.

This reduced the tubes' diameter as the awl created an inward Vee.

Once the tube is Vee'd it looses its grip enabling it to slip right up/out.

The tube is very tough steel so it doesn't Vee inward easily.

Not all awls are tough enough or slim enough for the job.

A long very slender center punch could also work.

Or even a long skinny tough nail.

Skinny and tough!

Thanks
Randy
 
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