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Looking forward to your progress !!

Hopefully your dyno testing will compare a stock exhaust manifold to a header.

Some of the fastest guys run a cast stocker and others a custom header.

I don't think anyone has done any actual back to back testing as of yet.

Thanks
Randy
 

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I believe the header makes a big difference on the N/A Engine but the turbo is a different deal.

Thanks
Randy

Not turbo here, but the Hooker header made originally for The Ram Charger bolts right up to the 84 Daytona tunnel and centered in the tunnel, was made with very long matched length primary tubes, and like double the length of a normal V8 Collector, and the primary tube ports in the plate right out of the stock Hooker header part number head exhaust ports to header ports are super near perfect, since we cannot touch the head and was a huge improvement over the stock exhaust manifold at least in my non-turbo application. A second and a quarter out of the box easy, and was within a tenth open or through a reduced midas type install of the balance of exhaust factory to rear bumper oval tip.

Mine is just the header now, fits in the decibel range, never failed sound test yet.
 

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The Turbo Exhaust manifold is a very compact unit that bolts directly to the cyl head.

The Turbo bolts directly to the exhaust manifold and is very close to the Engine.

As such, there is little, if any, heat loss to drive the Turbo.

The Turbo outlet (swing valve) is where the exhaust pipe bolts to.

The outlet is in about the dame spot as the N/A exhaust manifold outlet.

Any kind of header normally locates the Turbo farther away from the cyl head.

Most headers are tubular and don't hold heat as well as the iron Turbo manifold.

The Turbo absorbs much of the exhaust noise so require less exhaust for noise control.

There is lots of power to be gained using a free flowing swing valve and down pipe.

I'm sure Mr Hogue will be investigating all this very closely per NHRA.

Below is a pic of a typical stock Turbo and its location on the Engine.

Thanks
Randy

 
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