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Ok I took my 86 Daytona CS Z to a local muffler shop, and the guy told me that the O2 sensor is seized to the housing of the turbo. He said its cast and wont be able to drill it out or weld too it, so i am thinking i need a whole new turbo housing????? If so were can I get one?, and how cheep?
 

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tell him to try LocTite freeze-off.... I spent hours at work trying to get a hub off of a Dodge Ram at work and my boss sprayed it with that and knocked it with one blow of a hammer... good stuff!
 

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an old trick i used to do was ifyou can get the motor to run get it up to running temp. then take a ice cube to the sensor. quickly slap your wrench to it and it will come loose!!!!
 

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I have knocked the head off of the o2 sensor and then got a 22mm socket and a impact swivel and a impact gun and ahve gotten them off with that method.
 

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Also try heating the swingvalve with a propane/acetalyne torch. When it gets cherry red, use the proper sized wrench on the o2 sensor. The expansion of the sv coupled with the relatively "cold" temp of the o2 sensor usually helps break rust bonds.
 

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Also try heating the swingvalve with a propane/acetalyne torch. When it gets cherry red, use the proper sized wrench on the o2 sensor. The expansion of the sv coupled with the relatively "cold" temp of the o2 sensor usually helps break rust bonds.
^^^+1,
Addendum if I may...
if the (in this case) swingvalve cools to 'dull red' the 1/4 turn 'grind & bind'
demon will rear its ugly head.

Rust hates heat!!!
Keep the s/v cherry red ... the O/2 housing will surrender!!

P.s., exercise care with cherry hot metal parts...
Slow and steady wins the race here!!
 

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I have knocked the head off of the o2 sensor and then got a 22mm socket and a impact swivel and a impact gun and ahve gotten them off with that method.
those O2 sockets are for non turbos.
That's more or less what I do. The turbos really heat them up and make it hard to get loose. I bought a box end wrench and cut the open end off and slipped some conduit on the cut end for a breaker bar. My conduit has a bend which allows one click from the top of the engine. I don't even have to get under the car to get them loose.
 

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leave the damaged o2 in the car and put a bung farther down the pipe , worst case you have to lengthen the new o2 wires
 

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If you read most repair manuals from the 80's they tell u to warm up engine from cold then remove, then install on warm engine. So many manifolds were stripped because this was not followed, this was new stuff and no one knew. We would never think to do this hot, exhaust manifolds hurt bad. After struggling with one i read several manuals and was stumped, i just dawned on me I stripped it in cold and ruined the manifold.
 

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I have knocked the head off of the o2 sensor and then got a 22mm socket and a impact swivel and a impact gun and ahve gotten them off with that method.
yeah this works great(i just used a 1/2 drive socket on a huge ext)... sounds like the guy didn't try to hard getting it out



they make it a 22mm so you can really torque on it!

sounds like everyone has had some experience getting them out LOL

i like the ice cube idea!!!
 

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If you cant remove it like suggested, install a bung further down the line. Also remove the downpipe and knock the sensor head off the o2 sensor if it is planning on staying in there, no sense in having a "random" stick in your exhaust system that doesnt do anything.
 

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And MOST DEFINITELY use the 22mm...I used a 22mm socket, 24" breaker bar, and a 24" section of 1" copper pipe on the end of the breaker and mine came out. Granted, it is a very long slow process as you can't make much swing with that set-up, but I've used "Mr. Happy Persuasion" on many of my other Daytona fasteners (struts, shocks, etc), their resistance is useless and futile and they soon always surrender...
 

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About a year ago I had one on my GLHS that just would not budge. I tried first the special O2 sensor socket, couldn't get enough angle/leverage with a standard ratchet. Heated the housing to red hot, using 22mm wrench,alone, hard to keep it hot and turn the wrench too. PBPlaster for several nights. No joy.

Eventually, had to drop the engine down far enough to actually get some tools in there, like a lever bar and approiate socket, that did it for sure, snapped the sensor right off leaving the threads in the housing. So I drilled out what was left of the sensor in the housing and then used a chisel to tap out what was left from the O2 sensor threads. I drilled out just short of the same size of the threads so removing the old portion of the O2 sensor was just a few whacks to crack the remainder out. Once it was cracked, a little pry or two later and it came right out...no turning. And the threads in the housing were still perfect.

It took all friggin day,and just about every tool in the box. It's spose' to be a 30 minute job!

And don't forget the Neverseize on the new threads!
 

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About a year ago I had one on my GLHS that just would not budge. I tried first the special O2 sensor socket, couldn't get enough angle/leverage with a standard ratchet. Heated the housing to red hot, using 22mm wrench,alone, hard to keep it hot and turn the wrench too. PBPlaster for several nights. No joy.

Eventually, had to drop the engine down far enough to actually get some tools in there, like a lever bar and approiate socket, that did it for sure, snapped the sensor right off leaving the threads in the housing. So I drilled out what was left of the sensor in the housing and then used a chisel to tap out what was left from the O2 sensor threads. I drilled out just short of the same size of the threads so removing the old portion of the O2 sensor was just a few whacks to crack the remainder out. Once it was cracked, a little pry or two later and it came right out...no turning. And the threads in the housing were still perfect.

It took all friggin day,and just about every tool in the box. It's spose' to be a 30 minute job!

And don't forget the Neverseize on the new threads!
the problem with a socket and breaker bar is that it applies the force in the wrong way. I can't figure out how to explain it. A socket and a long extension and impact wrench will apply the force properly.
That is why I cut the open end off a wrench and use a pipe extension for more torque. The force is right where it needs to be.
 

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yada yada yada... Sometimes they just aint comming out. Another I had (BMW) turned it so hard (22mm wrench with pipe extension)that I actually broke the weld on the bung and the O2 sensor did come out then....with the bung still on it! LOL.

If you can get the housing hot enough and a good wrench on it, it will come out. Anything less than that, when its a stubborn one, it's pretty much up to luck, persistance, and the higher power.
 

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i have a tool at work that attaches to my air hammer, with a special o2 sensor socket on it, you slip it over the o2, attach it to the air hammer and viberate it, o2's walk right out with it.
 
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