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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greeting from NL Canada. Just wondering if there is a fuel pump relay for a 1986 Omni GLHS? I recently obtained this car car and want to pump the old fuel out of the tank as it has been sitting for a decade. I can't find much information on if its a separate relay or part of a module. It would be a lot easier to jump the relay and just use the fuel pump to remove the old fuel.
 

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1989 Dodge Shadow 2.5 non turbo 3 speed automatic
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I recently obtained this car car and want to pump the old fuel out of the tank as it has been sitting for a decade.
I would not suggest using the in tank pump. If there is debris, rust, thick varnish, or other stuff in the tank you could plug the screen or kill the pump. When I needed to drop the tank on my shadow we were able to get a fuel siphon down the fill tube and suck out most of the fuel. Then we dropped the tank. (the car was parked because the pump died)
 

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^ good advice, especially if as you say the fuel may be a decade old ..

I suggest siphoning as much as you can,
then adding a gallon or 2 of fresh fuel,
disconnect line at fuel rail and use the electric pump to pump a liter or 2,
then change your fuel filter ;)
 

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Looks like a nice GLHS! Congrats on the purchase.
The ASD relay in integrated inside the power module. You can put a jumper wire on the positive side of battery and to the positive side of the coil. This will send power to the Z1 circuit which provides power to the coil, injectors, fuel pump, and heated o2 sensor.
If you trying to remove really old fuel I would suggest disconnecting before the fuel filter if you're plan is to reuse the filter. Otherwise you can disconnect underhood where the fuel lines connect to the hard lines and run into container. SOME fuel pump assemblies had a siphon port which allowed you to drain the tank. The original fuel pump assembly in you GLHS was actually an internal AND external pump. The external pump would many times leak after years of non use. The internal pump would fail often as it was a POS design. I've often said it wasn't much more sophisticated than a windshield washer pump. It's sole purpose was to prime the external pump. HOPEFULLY someone has changed this assembly out to the single pump design.
I would plan on changing fuel filter, lines and clamps, after you know you don't have a rusty inside of tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the advise. Hopefully I will have the car running in the next few days.
 

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BTW if you still have the original two pump system in your GLHS you may find it weeping (dripping) at startup. Often the o-ring gaskets will swell and reseal itself! Got to love self healing parts!
What # car is it?
 

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I would not suggest using the in tank pump. If there is debris, rust, thick varnish, or other stuff in the tank you could plug the screen or kill the pump. When I needed to drop the tank on my shadow we were able to get a fuel siphon down the fill tube and suck out most of the fuel. Then we dropped the tank. (the car was parked because the pump died)
I definitely agree.
It's a longer process, but safer for your pump and the lines running to the engine.
And always have a fire extinguisher on hand.
 

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Drained fuel tank and lines, changed oil and filter , and premium gas
I'm afraid I'm going to have to go the same route.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm going to remove and clean the injectors, replace the coolant , hoses, belts, and possibly water pump as well.
 

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I'm going to remove and clean the injectors, replace the coolant , hoses, belts, and possibly water pump as well.
Those are smart things to do.
 

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I'm going to remove and clean the injectors, replace the coolant , hoses, belts, and possibly water pump as well.
Be aware aftermarket waterpumps are inferior quality to Mopar OEM. I'd definitely check it though. There are a few tricks you can do on the waterpump housing and injectors to aid you on re-installing and efficiency. The fuel rail is a bit tricky removing on the TII L-bodies. Do a search on this forum if you need some pointers removing it.
Congrats on getting it running again! #487 looks like California emission model. It looks like one of the later ones altered by Shelby.
 
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