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89 Daytona TII. My issue with temp is only when going into boost or uphill. Temp starts to climb and top out at 220. But goes right down to 208 then 200.
I have a front mount large intercooler now so I am waiting for the outside temp to climb so I can drive it an hour or so.
I think I am heat soaking it and the flow of coolant and air flow through the front is not adequate for high boost and higher speeds.
I do have the S10 air dam.
I am actually looking to get a TBI hood and cut in 2 turbo 600 hood vents placed over the area on front of the motor behind the radiator to get the hot air out of the engine compartment.
Any thoughts?

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Moved post to an individual thread. Sounds like you need to do some cooling system troubleshooting, condition of your coolant (running straight water?), thermostat/rad clogged?, waterpump impeller may need disassembly and inspection, they rot away overtime so you won't get much flow.
 

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Just so you are aware, the normal temp for the cooling fan to cycle on is 210 degrees, it is usually off about 192.

As already stated, first you need to check and verify all basic cooling system components are OK...
Coolant Mix, No Air, No Collapsed/Soft Hoses, Water Pump is Circulating Coolant, Proper Thermostat Operation, Proper Cooling Fan Operation.

Once you have verified the Cooling System Basics are OK...
The problem you are describing sounds like an Air Flow issue related to the Front Air Deflector.
Is the cooling fan running when your issue occurs?
If the car does not overheat at idle with the hood closed and the cooling fan comes on at the proper temp and coolant temp drops then the radiator is not blocked, you have an issue getting fresh air to the radiator while driving.
 

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So I have a similar question....

I've set up my '88 Daytona TII for endurance racing, so I've deleted the t-stat and put the fan on a switch. All was good until my stock temp gauge went out, so I wired up an electric Derale to the waterbox. On hard street driving 75 - 90 mph, it tops out at 220 F. When you back off and cruise, it comes down to about 180-200 ish.
So, really two questions....what is normal (the other threads seem to suggest it is in that ballpark) and what would be considered "hot"? Second question, any ideas on how to get the heat out of this thing? I was looking at a dual fan set up and / or a larger aluminum radiator.

(The tiny little stock radiator is long gone, replaced with the larger NA radiator and the IC is moved down below the bumper.)
 

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On a normal/ stock 2.2/ 2.5L the cooling fan cycles on at 210 degrees and cycles off at 192 Degrees.
Be sure you have the proper mix of coolant/water to properly absorb and dissapate heat.
Sometimes removing a thermostat completely makes an engine run hotter because without the resistance the coolant flows to quickly through the radiator to properly dissapate heat.
You may want to consider a 160 thermostat.
 

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NAJ, that makes sense to me, we could just be circulating hot water. I have the old stock part in a box somewhere I can stick in there to test it out and will do that before trying anything else.
Where would I find a 160 t-stat? The best I can find is a 180 deg.
Also, I have the 50/50 premix crap from the carpart store. Note that the race organizers require all water, no Ethylene Glycol coolant allowed - so eventually, this has got to run on water. I will keep the EG in there until race day. I may put water wetter in there later, but that's too expensive to keep pouring all over my garage floor as I work on this mess.

There's a bit more to the story.....
In the few races we've done, we've always fought cooling issues. I went so far as to cut holes in the front fascia, and cut out a bunch of sheet metal around where the bigger radiator was partially blocked. Originally, I had a fan cooled oil cooler up front - but I decided that took up too much real estate and was just one more thing blocking clean / cool air getting to the radiator. Now, I got it in my head that when it comes to radiators - bigger is better; so I bought a big aluminium racing radiator (GM style), and was going to shoehorn it in there. I could make it fit long ways, but it was too tall (d'oh). After some digging around here some, I came across Radiator Express who sells an all aluminium drop in replacement (again for the 2.5 engine). In my mind, that could help because Al is a better conductor, but it is a single pass radiator with a 1" core - just like stock. Does anyone have any experience with the all aluminum radiator?

Maybe I am just over thinking, but I gotta cool this thing down so it will last 8 hours on a race track.
 

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Be sure your radiator cap is operating properly and is the proper pressure.
It's job besides keeping coolant in the radiator is to increase the boiling point.
Every 1 PSI of pressure increases the boiling point by 3 degrees, so with straight water and a 15 lb pressure cap the water will not boil until 257 degrees.
If you have restrictions in front of the radiator you also may want to try to a lower air deflector to bring cooler air up to the radiator while the car is moving.
 
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