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1999 2500 cummings. With norman driving, not towing, temps are ok, but I can fluctuate the temp from just below the half way mark to just over the mark by hitting 1100d. on the pyrometer a few times, and it rises in a matter of 20-30 seconds. While towing my 34' 5th whl, any grade of say a couple miles will send the temps over the hot mark, and into the red if I don't let off. I drive this thing like I have a egg under the pedal, o.d. locked out when required. It has gone to red a couple times when I could not stop where I was. Found a leaking injector on the last incident and replaced it, but it still runs hot. Also I've had radiator checked for cool spots, changed thermostat, fan clutch, coolant, rad. cap. I need some serious imput, Its dune season and I;m stuck at home Please HELP> Thanks , One Hot Diesel
1999 DODGE 2500, 410'S, BANKS TLC SYSTEM, 4" EXHAUST, ATS EXHAUST MANIFOLD, K&N FILTER, 285/75 TIRES, TURBO BOOST NO MORE THAN 27
 

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How many miles? Do you have the aux. cooler under the bed. Is coolant properly mixed.When was the last time you ran a overhead for intake/exhaust and injectors?
 

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NO: 07-08-98
SUBJECT: Diesel Engine Overheating
DATE: Dec. 11, 1998
NOTE: THIS INFORMATION APPLIES TO VEHICLES EQUIPPED WITH A 24 VALVE CUMMINS DIESEL ENGINE WITH AN ENGINE SERIAL NUMBER (ESN) 56512007 OR PRIOR.

SYMPTOM/CONDITION:
Some vehicles may overheat or run hotter than normal. In some cases DTC P0217 - DECREASED ENGINE PERFORMANCE DUE TO ENGINE OVERHEAT may be set.

DIAGNOSIS:
If a vehicle is brought in for an overheat condition, check the ESN to determine if the engine falls within the build range. If it does not, continue with normal cooling system diagnostics listed in the appropriate service manual. If it does fall within the range, perform the Repair Procedure.

PARTS REQUIRED:
Qty Part No. Description
1 05015090AA Thermostat


REPAIR PROCEDURE:
This bulletin involves replacing the thermostat with a revised part.

Replace the thermostat with p/n 05015090AA following all service manual Cautions, Warnings, and procedures.
POLICY:
Reimbursable within the provisions of the warranty.

TIME ALLOWANCE:
Labor Op. No. Time
07-40-01-92 0.4 Hrs.


FAILURE CODE:
Code Description
P8 New Part

INTERNAL LEAKAGE TEST
Remove engine oil pan drain plug and drain a small amount of engine oil. If coolant is present in the pan, it will drain first because it is heavier than oil. An alternative method is to operate engine for a short period to churn the oil. After this is done, remove engine dipstick and inspect for water globules. Also inspect transmission dipstick for water globules and transmission fluid cooler for leakage.

WARNING: WITH COOLING SYSTEM PRESSURE TESTER TOOL INSTALLED ON RADIATOR, DO NOT ALLOW PRESSURE TO EXCEED 110 KPA (20 PSI) PRESSURE WILL BUILD UP QUICKLY IF A COMBUSTION LEAK IS PRESENT. TO RELEASE PRESSURE, ROCK TESTER FROM SIDE TO SIDE. WHEN REMOVING TESTER, DO NOT TURN TESTER MORE THAN 1/2 TURN IF SYSTEM IS UNDER PRESSURE.

Operate engine without pressure cap on radiator until thermostat opens. Attach a pressure tester to filler neck. If pressure builds up quickly it indicates a combustion leak exists. This is usually the result of a cylinder head gasket leak or crack in engine. Repair as necessary.

If there is not an immediate pressure increase, pump the pressure tester. Do this until indicated pressure is within system range of 110 kPa (16 psi) Fluctuation of gauge pointer indicates compression or combustion leakage into cooling system.

Because the vehicle is equipped with a catalytic converter, do not remove spark plug cables or short out cylinders (non-diesel engines) to isolate compression leak.

If the needle on dial of pressure tester does not fluctuate, race engine a few times to check for an abnormal amount of coolant or steam. This would be emitting from exhaust pipe. Coolant or steam from exhaust pipe may indicate a faulty cylinder head gasket, cracked engine cylinder block or cylinder head.

A convenient check for exhaust gas leakage into cooling system is provided by a commercially available Block Leak Check tool. Follow manufacturers instructions when using this product.

COMBUSTION LEAKAGE TEST - WITHOUT PRESSURE TESTER
DO NOT WASTE reusable coolant. If solution is clean, drain coolant into a clean container for reuse.

WARNING: DO NOT REMOVE CYLINDER BLOCK DRAIN PLUGS OR LOOSEN RADIATOR DRAINCOCK WITH SYSTEM HOT AND UNDER PRESSURE. SERIOUS BURNS FROM COOLANT CAN OCCUR.

Drain sufficient coolant to allow thermostat removal. Refer to Thermostat Replacement. Disconnect water pump drive belt.

Add coolant to radiator to bring level to within 6.3 mm (1/4 in) of top of thermostat housing.

CAUTION: Avoid overheating. Do not operate engine for an excessive period of time. Open draincock immediately after test to eliminate boil over.

Start engine and accelerate rapidly three times, to approximately 3000 rpm (2000 rpm for diesel) while observing coolant. If internal engine combustion gases are leaking into cooling system, bubbles will appear in coolant. If bubbles do not appear, internal combustion gas leakage is not present.
 

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I own a 1998 12 valve cummins and I also have a overheat problem when I'm towing my 33' fifth wheel. The tow capacity of my truck is 10,000 lbs and my trailer weighs 8200 dry. I have a "BD" transmission which increases my performance including milage. I was beginning to wonder if that might be my problem. I have found that keeping your speed up, (around 60 mph or 100kph) helps to hold down on the heat. As soon as your speed drops on an incline, the temp begins to rise quickly. It takes a bit of forethought to read the road ahead and if you see a hill coming up, start accelerating well in advance.

I'm currently looking to see if anyone knows of a super cooling system that can be installed. (EX: Larger rad, or transmission cooler.)

If anyone has any information about such items, I'd be greatful to hear about them.


Cal
 

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A custom radiator shop could make you up a "thicker" radiator, with more cores.

I think you should check your cooling system, and possibly have it serviced and flushed.
 

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You could also be going lean on huge inclines that require you to be in the throttle the whole time it maybe that the load is too great for the injector pump to keep up.
But as stated before, have your cooling system serviced and flushed, have anything replaced based on mileage that is suggested, and have the dealer do a basic inspection over the vehicle for overheating.
 

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Thanks guys. I will definately try the cooling system flush and clean out the rad fins as a start. Hopefully that will cure my problem. The informaton here has been extremely helpful. Thanks again

Cal
 

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not sure on the 24v but I use the Chevy high performance stats with the 12v Cummins. Lot more flow.



the hole is the size of the lower section, huge compared to stock
 

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How many miles are on the truck and has it sat around alot?

Ive seen trucks that sit and use the regular green coolant will plug the bottom 1/3 of the radiator. To verify this with the truck cold start it up and let the engine come up to temp and cycle the thermostat once. Shut the truck down and run your hand as close to the middle of the radiator from top to bottom. If the top is hot and the bottom is cold, its plugged.
 

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we have had a bunch of 12v tow trucks mainly 94-98s and they would always get hot on long passes. but our 03 up cummins dont ever get over 220 ever no matter whats behind them.

all our tow trucks range from 11k-13klbs pluss what ever they are towing, i know that dont help you but it just dont make any sense why the newer trucks dont over heat
 

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I went over the scales with a hair under 29,000 lbs with my 93, it doesn't get hot. Doesn't stop or turn very well though lol. Also hauled my D500 Dump truck on a 25 ft T14 beaver tail home from Reno, never got to half way.

The Cummins has a real high volume truck water pump, needs the big dog stat.
 

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You could also be going lean on huge inclines that require you to be in the throttle the whole time it maybe that the load is too great for the injector pump to keep up.
But as stated before, have your cooling system serviced and flushed, have anything replaced based on mileage that is suggested, and have the dealer do a basic inspection over the vehicle for overheating.
diesels don't run lean, they only inject enough diesel for that rpm and if it doesn't inject enough the rpm falls. if load gets too high and you inject too much diesel without more air it will smoke.


cummins engineered the radiator and fan too cool stock power continuously. if your making more power than stock, the temps will climb slowly.

if you added power and want to keep cool, get an aluminum radiator that is larger than stock, and upgrade the fan
 

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we have had a bunch of 12v tow trucks mainly 94-98s and they would always get hot on long passes. but our 03 up cummins dont ever get over 220 ever no matter whats behind them.

all our tow trucks range from 11k-13klbs pluss what ever they are towing, i know that dont help you but it just dont make any sense why the newer trucks dont over heat
newer trucks have less wear and tear on their cooling systems, better engineered cooling systems.

if your truck is designed for 230hp and has to use every drop of it to go uphill it will more likely over heat than a 325hp truck that only uses 250hp to go up the same hill.

also, the amount of air the intercooler has to cool down becomes a factor as well, because it will pre heat up the air that is going directly into your radiator. small turbo's like the hx35 and h1c produce a lot of excess heat when towing up hill and the intercooler has to the temps down. try touching a compressor housing on a turbo after a hard drive or a tow, I guarantee you it's extremely hot.
 

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not sure on the 24v but I use the Chevy high performance stats with the 12v Cummins. Lot more flow.



the hole is the size of the lower section, huge compared to stock
hi there mr pope that stat looks like a robert shaw . ive got a 95 w/overheating problems got a part#( 60mm). please.
 

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when you go to an auto parts store like Orielys or Shucks you look for the Mr Gasket chevy stat. They don't sell a million different sizes of stat, they only sell basically 2 sizes. Large older Mopar and the Chevy / Ford stat. This smaller Chevy stat is what you want. You also need to have your radiator rodded out to get the right volume through it as well.
 

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Here is a not so uncommon issue for a 1999 (maybe other years), The crank case breather tube is right behind the radiator fan and sucks the oil steam from the crank case and coats the radiator fins, I was looking at mine yesterday and its covered with muck and oil build up. Over time this will make the radiator not function correctly and create an overheating issue. I have 60k mines on my truck and its pretty bad.. I just was reading about this a couple weeks ago, I believe it was in the latest turbo diesel registry mag.
 

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thanks that will save sum cash. my cooling sys tem is nu,alum.rad 2core 2-3/8in clean block,intercoller, fins strait coolant stays clean runs great easly heats up on hills 1mi. to last line on guage headed for red. i allways bak off to keep temp down. 50 55 mph overdr. off.guage on air filter reads 12lb. #6 fuel plate all else stock.my concerns are, rad. cores to large ,trans.heat exchanger under turbo& exaust mani adding heat to cooling system? .i just baught this 28ft 5th wheel and its emty dont want to leave vegas in100deg. tremps. truck not built to tow any thing but a couple jet skis thanks again for tip
 

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just wanted 2 update it may help someone the trans slips alot more than u can imagine .i put a lock up[ switch ground ing wireon terminal 54 . now torque converter is locked up when i hit the button &i f i want to shift its manual but big diferance on my temps 2 bad had 2 replace head gasget ,rad,fan clutch ,colant ,thermostat 2 find out trans while slipping will over heat eng.thru heat exchanger.see ya c.b.m. las vegas nv 95 ex cab 4k gsk ,cobalt gauges,afc mods. #6 plate ,t/c lock out switch
 

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I have a non lock up 93 cummins truck, The converter sliping causes a ton of heat. I found a local that builds converters for the cummins, adds the billet aluminum retainer and roller bearings for $150. Best mod you can do along with the superior shift kit. Both with a big trans cooler and fan are a must. Unlike a V8 the trans cooler is on the engine, not the rad. So when you cook the trans it heats the engine.
 
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