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Discussion Starter #1
Will it fit the 94 2.5 distributor?
I realize new wires would be needed.
Is there any advantage?
 

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Looks like that's for a Jeep/AMC 2.5 Engine

Dakota used them in 1996 after the Trans Four Engine was discontinued in 1995.

Thanks
Randy
 

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Keep in mind, "this is your car and you can do anything you like to it", having said that...
Again I will play the "Devils Advocate".

Why...???
If you are using the stock distributor why do you want to change to a different style car/rotor/wire?
(Unless you are looking for an easier R+I of the Ignition Wires)
I have owned my car for 31 years and have NEVER had a issue related to the Secondary Ignition System either during Daily Driving or at the Track.
If you understand how electricity works (not saying you do or you don't) then you will realize that a small change such as you are planning will not improve performance at all.
The only time changes to the stock ignition system would be beneficial is if KV requirements become extremely high.
If you had access to this, you could see that there would be absolutely no change in anything.
s-l300.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's what I wondered. The prongs on the stock wires seem "iffy" to my old school sensibilities.
 

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Like I said, I have never had a Secondary Ignition problem in 31 years and that includes over 200 passes down the "1320', hitting the traps at 6100 RPM's in 3rd gear @ 12 lbs. of boost.
 

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That's what I wondered. The prongs on the stock wires seem "iffy" to my old school sensibilities.
I've found that on every 2.2L I've owned (1981 to present), the prongs always get pitted and the rotor wears down.
It's just normal wear.
What I do to prolong the use of the ignition wires is to remove the prongs from the cap and flip them around to the other (clean) side and re-insert them.
I also check that the prongs seat solidly into the cap.
I always click them in and then slide the boot down.
 

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Jim, you just illustrated one of the benefits of the so called iffy design!

It's very difficult to flip regular distributor cap contacts around.

Reminds me of the older GM starter solenoid contacts.

They could be reversed when worn and live on.

Times were different way back, parts were costly, labor not so much.

Folks learned more by actually fixing stuff, not just replacing parts.

I've been experimenting for well over 50 yrs.

Thanks
Randy

From Chrysler Engineer Dave Zelkowski:

More about aftermarket ignition...

The ONLY thing they will do for you is lighten your wallet. If there is nothing wrong with the stock ignition components it won't help. If you have some old tired components then it could be a benefit. I've been through this aftermarket ignition thing before. I spent a week on the dyno with the Super Touring 2.0L testing five different systems whose manufacturer's claimed big results. I found zero. The down side to their systems were that the complexity was increased and they weighed more.
 

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Jim, you just illustrated one of the benefits of the so called iffy design!

From Chrysler Engineer Dave Zelkowski:

More about aftermarket ignition...

The ONLY thing they will do for you is lighten your wallet. If there is nothing wrong with the stock ignition components it won't help. If you have some old tired components then it could be a benefit. I've been through this aftermarket ignition thing before. I spent a week on the dyno with the Super Touring 2.0L testing five different systems whose manufacturer's claimed big results. I found zero. The down side to their systems were that the complexity was increased and they weighed more.
Randy:

Regarding Dave Zelkowski; I still have an issue of Mopar Tech that shows Dave with the Super 60 Omni from Hell.

272333


I met him at SDAC-5 in 1995 where he was the road course tech inspector and a featured speaker at the convention.
 

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Right on Jim!!!

That's the article that inspired me to do the entire Super 60 deal on my Omni.

This was before I knew about the internet and I was totally impressed.

I bought my Omni new in 1986 and kept it stock other than a MP LM.

I had no idea these little Engines were sturdy enough to double the HP.!

My life was mostly big V8's and drag racing with the odd sports car.

Friends thought I was nuts buying this car brand new but it was magic!

Dave was active on the SDML back then and he was a great guy.

He shared his rigorous testing procedures on evaluating various things.

We had many conversations and he was always courteous and accurate.

I couldn't list all the cars I've owned but the Omni was the only new one I bought.

It still looks very nice considering it's over 30 yrs old.

Appreciate the trip down memory lane!!

Thanks
Randy
 

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Randy:

That article must have been from around 1995 maybe.
Dave also recommended going with what became the SLH brake package.
Too many people kept asking him how they could beef up the rear brakes on L-body cars.
He said "why would you want to do that? there's no weight back there"
In fact it's true, I always replace front pads and disks 2x more than rear shoes.

That black car in the article was sold and became the "Hooters" car I believe.

My first new car was a 1981 Plymouth TC-3 with all the options plus the Turismo (S-14) handling package and the new 2.2L engine w/A-460.
The thing only had 94 Hp. LOL!
Next new car was the 87 Shelby Charger.
I owned both at the same time and there was a big difference in acceleration with the turbo!

I added the Shelby 14 to 1 rack, the Direct Connection 1" lower / stiffer springs and Monroe Gas shocks along with a smaller Momo steering wheel to the TC3.
The TC3 out-performed the Shelby in handling.
 

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Right on Jim, around 1995-96 for sure.

I remember my car was about 10 yrs old at the time.

Interesting story on your first new car, 1981 TC3 2.2.

A neighbor bought a similar one when the 2.2 came out.

I was rather disrespectful about the new 2.2 Trans Four and razzed him.

Granted, it handled like it was on rails as you described but I was a jerk.

I had a Z28 LT-1 at the time and looked down my nose at his little FWD.

Little did I know I would become a great 2.2 enthusiast just a few years later!!

Thanks
Randy
 

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I still have the build sheet from the TC-3, and interestingly, it came with the very same Izumi steering wheel that came on the GLHS cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've turned a few solenoid contacts around. I still drill the rivets out of the remote solenoids and turn those.
So, in the immortal words of my favorite comedian...
WELL, EXXXCCCUUUSSSEEE ME!
 

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LOL!!

You scuuussseedd ;)

Thanks
Randy



I've turned a few solenoid contacts around. I still drill the rivets out of the remote solenoids and turn those.
So, in the immortal words of my favorite comedian...
WELL, EXXXCCCUUUSSSEEE ME!
 
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