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Old School Hot Rodder
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was back and forth the past few days with LaserDad on updating the wiring on these cars, specifically the power distribution system of fusible links and the three relays on the shock tower/inner fender area behind the battery and Power Module/SMEC/SBEC. He found one from a Jeep Cherokee with an end feed for the battery. I had grabbed one from a 1996 Dodge Stratus, and later scored one from a 2001 Sebring convertible as I thought I would need it and some other parts to provide a signal source for my "top down equalizer mode" in the 6 channel Infinity amplifier.

The Stratus and Sebring PDCs are mounted on the left side underhood with the long end containing the fuses and smaller relays forward and the positive battery connection behind it. On the left side near the back, under the large relays, there is a main wire bundle that goes to the interior and across underhood. On the forward portion there is a smaller bundle going down to the transaxle and engine computers along with an ABS unit.

By turning the PDC 90° counterclockwise, I was able to line the main bundle port up with the location used in 1986 for the front harness from firewall to battery and Power Module area. The smaller one ended up nicely close to the engine and transaxle connections near the transaxle mount. The bundles from inside, engine and SBEC all integrated nicely with the rest coming out of the PDC.

Mountings were fabricated to use the existing three mounting feet on the PDC. The outer one being a single screw required a strange angled bracket due to the compound angle forward of the left shock tower. The inner one needed to be open underneath so wiring could run through, front is attached to the top of the side rail and the back to the shock tower providing a very solid mount.
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Old School Hot Rodder
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
First, here is a link to LaserDad's thread PDC - Power Distribution Center Conversion

After figuring out the location and mounting, now it was wiring time. These PDCs can be opened up pretty easily, but I found that there are some differences in construction. My 1996 Stratus PDC is molded as a one piece block and the wiring, including the large battery source plate all inserts from the bottom. The connections and wires can be removed and relocated after opening the bottom by releasing the tab on the large relay end and the two hooks visible on the bottom cover.
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Once this is done you will see the wiring inside. On the top side, remove all the fuses and relays, then carefully pry the three plastic retainers up and remove them (red is the large relay end, blue and yellow are the small relay and fuses end.
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With these off the PDC will look like this:
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These are the Sebring PDC, and if you look closely at these you will notice on the second one a pair of latch tabs:
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With the wires removed or cut, the relay socket "cube" can be pulled out of the top. The other end requires being pretty well stripped as in LaserDad's thread.
 
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Old School Hot Rodder
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
With a plan in mind I started with the main power sources, the Stratus one actually had a bit less as far as what I needed and the 1986 internal wiring or the 1989 front end wiring I was using only provided for four main feeds into the interior and one to stay underhood (fans). Unfortunately, Chrysler wiring ID is a strange alpha-numeric system that changes from year to year and even from one body to another in the same year. I used three 40 amp fuses and one 20 amp to feed the interior and used some of the other underhood fuses for the turbo solenoid feed. I had already built a dual pusher fan system from a 1999 Ford Contour fan unit by reversing the blades and motor polarity. This system uses a resistor in series for low speed and bypasses it for high speed. SBEC controls low fan and a high pressure switch from a 1993 Grand Caravan provides high speed control.
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The other two large Bosch relays are starter and ASD, but the Stratus and Sebring PDCs both have a separate fuel pump relay fed by it's own fuse. I slaved it off the ASD relay. There is an AC relay, and wiring to run it only with low speed fan was already in the PDC There is a Transmission relay for the A604 transaxle so a V6 automatic car would have that source. There are also two wiper relays for high/low and intermittent wiper operation (I did not use these). On the Sebring convertible PDC, there is a power top relay that prevents the top from being operated unless the transaxle is in park or neutral.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I forgot to give the dimensions:
Overall length 11 1/2 inches
Overall width 5 inches
Overall height case 5 inches
To top of power stud 5 inches
Less mounting feet
Case length 10 1/2 inches
Case width 3 1/4 inches
Hollow pins on bottom 9.7 mm OD
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
As soon as I can locate my 1990 wiring diagram G and J body supplement, I have my notes on the Maxi fuses I used in place of the fusible links. When I started building the 1986, I had the wiring from the totaled 1985 and a good chunk of the wiring from a 1989 J body coupe 2.5L turbo automatic. The 1985 had been built using the latest version on the LM/PM system, 1987 Daytona electronics complete with a socketed LM. I still had all of that, but wanted to move up one or two generations. After researching my options, I discovered that the SMEC gave me only a one piece computer system, but still bank fired injectors. SBEC would give me sequential injectors which I wanted after having dealt with Ford bank fired vs sequential systems.

Since I had the front end wiring from the J body which included all the turbo specific solenoids and connectors along with most of the vacuum lines I decided to use that harness and just remove the headlight door wiring and change the SMEC plug to an SBEC plug. At my favorite junk yard I had found a 1991 Shadow convertible, 2.5L turbo automatic that included a lockup converter. Engine was a piece of junk, lots of signs of being well done. I was able to salvage most of the vacuum harness and a good bit of the engine and chassis wiring for the powertrain. By doing this I was able to get away from the grease sealed connectors used at least up through 1989 and replace them with nice weatherproof units.

First major issue was the front harness penetration through the firewall. 1986 used the pretty standard 50 way plug with male pins underhood and a 50 way female socket snapped into the firewall from inside the car. The 1989 J system used a round boot sealed to the harness ending in a female socket mounted on a diagonal brace from the wheel well to the cowl. This made the gender for the inside a reverse of the 1986 system. I originally tried a double ended adapter, but it was way too long to work. I also had to change the penetration from square to round. fortunately the round boot was more than big enough to cover the opening. First problem, was to hole saw the opening with no real guide, a piece of plywood and some short wood screws to provide a guide.
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here is what I ended up as fuses (I actually need to go back and update what I have installed to the correct values) These are from a chart someone provided based on the fusible links. I left the alternator with a fusible link, I may do a megafuse like I have on my truck for it's 160 amp alternator. The other rewiring I have done is upgrading the underhood plugs to newer style ones and rebuilding the ground cable to match the 1991 Shadow convertible I removed a bunch of underhood wiring from. The first two pictures are of the original cable, alternator, HEP. AC and engine sensor wiring. This was done by laying the ground cable with a bad end out and duplicating it (I hate clamp on battery cable ends). The third picture is the completed rebuilt cable bundle.

My fan system power was run from the PDC to a marine grade barrier strip with low fan, high fan and ground using nice lugs with the barrier strip. It resides partially under the battery tray. Since I am using a 1992 Imperial ATC system, I (a) have no vacuum lines and (b) wanted a cold ambient compressor lockout. I found a switch I had which goes open circuit at 32° F and wired it into the compressor control string, I used a 1993 Grand Caravan expansion valve (Factory R134 system) which has an anti-icing switch in it so the circuit runs from the control head, through the ambient switch behind the grille, back to the switch on the H valve, from there into the engine harness and the high pressure cutout switch in the compressor, them back to cavity 27 on the SBEC to signal it to turn on the compressor.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here are some pictures to go with LaserDad's PDC disassembly procedure ones. Removing the wires is the same as his, with one possible change. The PDCs I have are a 1996 Dodge Stratus (in my convertible) and a 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible (loose from the car). It has four different style female terminal ends on the wires. One for the Bosch cube relays, one for the small Bosch rectangular relays, one for the maxi fuse ends and one for the mini fuse ends. There are two double ended types that are used on the fuse direct battery feed ends, again one for maxi and one for mini.

I have some pictures of them. The Sebring PDC is a modular design, where once the wiring is either free or removed the large relay block and the fuse/small relay block can be removed from the actual PDC housing. The PDC PN is P04671352AG and is the dimensions I posted previously. In trying to figure out replacements, Chrysler's amazing wiring numbering system makes for loads of fun. Ford and GM use a straight number system, and once a circuit is assigned a number it stays that way, no longer used circuit numbers are just simply dropped, I think both may be up to 5 digit numbers by now. Chrysler's alpha-numeric system would probably be great if it was more consistent. Good example, ASD relay output on a 1986 K body is Z1, DG/BK, for a 1990, it is A61, DG/BK, by 1992 it became A142, DG/OR, 1996 Stratus it is A141, DG/WT, 2000 Sebring convertible it is A142, DG/OR. Not only year to year changes, but body to body in a given year.

Here are the PDC disassembled pictures and some wire terminal pictures:
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Pictures in order, bottom showing release latches, two pictures of the wires, PDC label, Cube relay sockets, cube relay lid, fuse and small relay module in housing, and removed with only the direct battery feed connectors installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Some more pictures of the PDC as I reassemble it. First is the A0 (battery) bus which is an aluminum stamping that presses in to the double ended fuse connectors. The numbers are the ones Chrysler used in the diagrams from the electrical volume of the FSMs and refer to cavity numbers. The cavity numbers are the same on both PDCs, the Sebring one is very hard to read though.

As for the fuse usage, the issue as I mentioned previously is Chrysler's numbering system and its changes from year to year and body to body. A0 is the battery in feed and all 9 of the maxi fuses are connected to the bus plate. Mini fuses, 2 through 8 are also connected to it, mini fuses 1, 9 & 10 are in-line for various circuits, 1 is fed by circuit A142 DG/OR from the ASD relay and feeds circuit F142, downstream O2 sensor heater. Mini fuses 9 & 10 are fed from circuit A21 DB and 10 feeds circuit F12 DB/WT to the fuel pump relay coil and ABS system along with the PCM. Mini fuse 9 feeds a number of the relay coils in the PDC. First PDC diagram is the 1996 Stratus, second is the 2000 Sebring convertible.
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In post #7 I put in a picture of the charging system for a 1989 LeBaron coupe. This was the donor vehicle for my underhood harness that I modified for (a) the 1996 Stratus PDC and (b) to run an SBEC instead of an SMEC. If you go back and look at the charging system diagram you will note the circuit numbers are: A1, battery positive to fusible link "fan" then R6 from alternator, A3 is on a different sheet, and is the hazard flasher feed. C13 is rear window defroster feed, C26 is AC compressor clutch relay feed, J1 and J10 are ignition switch feeds along with J2 coming back from the ignition switch. L1 is light switch feed.

When I went to set up the in feeds to the bulkhead connector (inside on the 1989 harness) I found I had all the power circuits were Axx numbers and most of the color and size matched the 1989 after fusible links. A1 is now A0, A3 is now A15, C13 is now A4, C26 is A16 and is internal to the PDC, J1 is now A1, J10 is now A2, L1 is now A3. There are a few, A51 a low current feed that powers an ignition off draw that receives power in off, run and start, but not lock or acc. This is due to the completely different ignition switch design and weren't used.

I ran circuits A1, A2, A3 and A4 in using the larger pins on the 50 way connector, all are 12 ga wires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Let me see if this will work, I did a spreadsheet in Excel, documenting the PDC fuses and bulkhead 50 way connector I used. I started with a 1989, but when searching for a replacement body computer after the 1995 one had a smoke leak, I was offered a good price on a complete 1990 dash harness from a J body convertible, which actually runs all the way to the fuel tank, rear lights and all 4 power windows. It has the same "inverted" connector as the 1989 did so I listed the 1990 50 way circuits and the ones I used in T2K-CAR (VA license plates),
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The one I used came from a 1996 Stratus, I have a 2000 Sebring one that is pretty much identical. If you go junkyard prowling, try to get as much of the wiring harness in each direction you can.
 
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