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Discussion Starter #1
When I finally decided to relocate the battery, to the rear of my Laser, I couldn't find much info on how to do the entire conversion, so I decided to post this here. I'll eventually post the parts and price list. I'm sure there are better ways to do the conversion, but at least this will show one method.

My car is an '86 Laser, but a lot of the hatchbacks should be pretty close. I wanted to mount it passenger rear, to move weight to the opposite side, but the wheel well doesn't leave enough room. There is just enough room on the driver's side, so that's where I put it. I used the Morosso box, but did not buy the complete kit, because I went with a longer ground cable. If I did it again, I would just get the kit, with the short black cable.



This is how the inside layout will be. At first, I planned to put the red cable on the left, but later moved it to the right. The hold down clamp is secured by 2 threaded rods.



Start by locating the hold down clamp in the center, and drilling 2 holes, in the bottom of the box.


I found that the floor wasn't level, so I made a small mounting bar, and shimmed it, underneath. The holes are the same spacing as the top hold down clamp. Again, I had to reverse the cables, after the pic was taken.


You will need a third hole for the vent. I plan to only use gel type batteries, so I probably didn't need a vent, but that's how it's supposed to be done.


I drilled the box about halfway up. The Morosso kit comes with grommets, for the vent and cables to seal the box.


Position the box and mount the hold down rods, with 2 nuts near the bottom.


This is how it looks from underneath.


Put the battery in and put the clamp on. I added spacers, so that I won't have to thread the top nuts down so far.


Put the clips into the holes, at the top of the box.


I routed the cables to the rear, then forward, under the box. If you use a shorter black cable, you can mount it to the hold down bolt, under the box.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Every rear battery conversion should have a cutoff switch. I thought of several different locations, but settled on the top of the box. I bought a switch that came with an indicator plate.

You need to leave enough cable length, inside the box, to allow you to mount different batteries, in different orientations. If not, someday you will wish you did.

This is how the underside will end up.


This will be the top.


Locate a spot that will not be close to any battery terminals.


Drill 2 holes for the switch lugs.


Mount the switch.


Mount the positive battery cable. You can see the gasket that seals the top of the lid. Cut it to length and put some glue on it.


As you can see, the plate is a couple inches above the lid.


I used a small plastic box, as a spacer.


This is how it looks connected.


It's hard to see here, but there are several push pins that secure the lid. They are not screwed in, just pushed straight down. When you turn them, 1/4 turn, they pop right out, making for a quick lid removal.


That's it for the box. Now on to the cables.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Running the cables is one of the tougher parts of the project, but you would think it would be easy.

I decided to locate the ground cable into the frame, behind the rear seat. Looking back, it would be just as good to locate it under the battery box, saving you 3ft of cable.


This spot puts the hole just in front of the rear spring.




Put a 3/8" threaded rod through the hole, and mount the end of the black cable to it.


All that's left is the red cable. Route it under the side panel.


I was replacing the carpet, which made routing the cable much easier.


This is where the cable will mount, at the firewall. The trick is finding a spot to put the post through. I chose the small open spot, near the clutch pedal pivot.


The thicker side goes on the engine side, so that you can put the locknut inside. I put the cable on first.


There isn't much room between the brake booster and shock tower, but it fits.


To cut the hole, I drilled a hole, then used a hole cutter.


It's hard to see, but the lock nut is on the inside.


That finishes the inside of the car.


I haven't finished off the engine compartment yet, but should have it done, by the end of the year, and will post the pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I forgot to mention that others are welcome to post their conversions on this thread. I want to make it a useful thread for anyone wanting to do any of our cars, not just a Laser.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's taken me a while, but I finally finished off the conversion. I haven't started the car yet, but the work is done.

Here is a link to the bulkhead mount:
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-g1431-red

I ran the cable over the transmission mount, and along the wheel well, next to the existing harness. If you are worried about it being cut and shorting out, you can put wrapping around it, but I don't see the need. I forgot to take a pic of it.

Since I no longer have a battery, in the front, I used terminal mounting posts instead. You can just see the black, negative mount, in front of the SMEC.


The 3 cables are from the battery, starter, and power distribution center.

To determine the correct cable length, stretch it to where the terminal mount is, then add 6 inches. If it's too long, you can always shorten it later. 2 gauge cable is hard to cut, so I used an end cutter to work my way through it.


Trim away 1" of insulation. I used a 2 gauge terminal lugs, with a 3/8" hole.



Taylor Battery Cable Terminal Kits 21409 - Free Shipping on Orders Over $99 at Summit Racing

They allow you to tightly lock the cable, without having to crimp it. You can even take them apart and reuse.


Even though there is clearance around the mount, I wrapped all of the cables with red electrical tape. Red heat shrink would have been nicer, but tape works.


Now that the battery is gone, there's plenty of room for a cone filter, in my cool airbox. The finished version will look a lot nicer.


You can see how much room it freed up. The new airbox is about 2/3 as wide, but will have about the same air volume. It should allow a lot more space for the intercooler plumbing.


I'm working on a writeup for my PDC conversion, but it's pretty lengthy, so it will take a while to finish. It eliminated the fusible links and external relays.
 

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What is the PDC out of or is it aftermarket? I've been searcing the junkyards for the perfect fit - unforutnetly I can't find any early 90's turbododge to steal one from at the moment so i'm considering alternatives

Awesome work!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What is the PDC out of or is it aftermarket? I've been searcing the junkyards for the perfect fit - unforutnetly I can't find any early 90's turbododge to steal one from at the moment so i'm considering alternatives

Awesome work!
Thanks, I found that the '93 - 2000 Jeep Cherokees are a nice alternative, and are customizable. They accept the same wiring terminals that our cars used. My write up will have lots of pics and hopefully make the conversion easy.
 

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The best thing about the battery being in the rear is that there is now more room up front for my intercooler plumbing to go through the front bulkhead.


I run the Laser's full size radiator, so there's not much room between the radiator and cool air box. In fact, this was taken during mock up. I ended up having to relocate the blow off valve to be under the intercooler, because there wasn't room.





 

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I don't believe a system like this will shut the car off once it's running. The car will stay running off the alternator. Also I don't like the idea of no wire protection. Most batteries of that size will push 1000 amps short circuit which will set the entire wire on fire until the battery explodes or the wire burns through. Large circuit breakers or fuses would be cheap insurance on not burning your car down.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I don't believe a system like this will shut the car off once it's running. The car will stay running off the alternator. Also I don't like the idea of no wire protection. Most batteries of that size will push 1000 amps short circuit which will set the entire wire on fire until the battery explodes or the wire burns through. Large circuit breakers or fuses would be cheap insurance on not burning your car down.
That's a good point. Of all the relocation articles, that I have seen, I don't recall one using a breaker/fuse. From now on, I will.
 
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