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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys
Le Baron T2 1989 manual

After rebuilding the engine, including new clutch/plate (LUK 05-060), bolts (ARP), flywheel milled, clutch cable, all rubber mounts.... soon these problems arised:

1) The self adjustment is not working properly, so cable loses tension. This is a point of irritation since shifting gets more weary, but I have gotten used to pressing the clutch pedal 2-3 times and then it works normally. I have tried to pull the clutch pedal backwards (something I read somewhere) but it does not help. Also I tried putting in an extra washer where the cable meets the arm. Thinking about replacing the clutch cable for something with manual tensioner, is it a good idea?

2) However, it works much worse in reverse. It started with the engine shaking slightly in certain positions/combinations of pedals - but was still manageable.
Now it has gotten terrible. I can always get the reverse gear in (after 2-3 pedals to the bottom) but now I can almost not go in reverse. The whole car shakes and the smell of burnt clutch can be felt around the block. By now, I feel like I can go reverse maybe 10 times more and then the whole thing will blow up or something. Last time it was like the gear, though in place, did not engage at all- only the shakes.

I had none of these problems before the engine rebuild. I am not a beginner with cars but this one beats me. I have thought of a few possible explanations (low oil in trans? alignment? vibration dampers?) but none of them make sense since I believe they should affect the forward gears too.

Any suggestions?
 

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Have a buddy apply the clutch and have a look at how it engages the clutch arm, see if it's pulling it near all the way up, and releasing it all the way down. Inspect the cable and where it mounts. If it's not fully pulling the clutch arm up and letting it release fully, I would then disassembly the clutch cable and self-adjustment and check to see that the cable moves freely, and that no teeth are missing on the self-adjustment block.

Next, remove the air box and inspect shift linkage. You can remove the linkages and shift the trans by hand, see if all gears engage smoothly

If everything is great, I suggest you have a clutch problem, even though it is new, something could have springs could have failed something came loose, ie. flywheel bolts, pressure plate bolts,
 

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I assume you are saying the "shaking in reverse" is when the clutch is engaged.
The engine torques differently in forward and reverse gears, check the engine mounts for damage or not being properly secured/centered.

TRANS-Clutch Cable 1.jpg

TRANS-Clutch Cable 2.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So, an update:

Turned out to be three different problems.

First, the clutch pedal. I removed the cable from gearbox and mid bracket, then I did my best to clean and lubricate behind the pedal, and wiggling the cable. Suddenly, it said sproing and something happened making the tensioner jump into position. So from that on, no problem with play in the pedal - and clutch does what it should.

Second, I discovered that the torque strut was damaged and stuck. So I tried building another one with threaded bolt and soft rubber bushings. Also, I found that tilting the engine downwards (in the back) made it easier to get it in first gear. I therefore seat the bolt positions accordingly and it worked at first. But after a test drive, I still had shakes - but less than before. And... first gear was still very hard again. Somehow the engine had repositioned its angle.

So, I thought the problem was the soft bushings and tried with harder ones plus re-positioning the home-built torque dampener again. On the test drive things only had gotten worse... Shakes were terrible yet again, and I figured: use the softer ones and reposition yet again.

Third, and finally, I looked into the engine position as a whole, and figured out that it needed to go both forward in the front and downward (even more) in the back. This led me to the adjusting the front engine mount. And there, HEUREKA, I discovered what was the real problem all along: the bracket was loose. One bolt in the engine was not there at all, two were a bit loose, only one was as it should.
I have no idea how this could happen but the fault was of course entirely my own. Eternal shame.

So, after tightening those bolts (with Loctite this time) I finally got rid of the shakes. Now, all that is left is to find the perfect tilt position to make the shifter cables move better. First gear is still a bit hard to engage, but I figure it can be solved.

And that is how you spend 2,5 days of vacation...

Anyway, thank you so much for leading me in the right direction!

All the best from a hot Stockholm.
 

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is the bracket that holds the cables on the trans bent? Do the cables move freely when not hooked up to the shifting arms on the trans? In trying to bend my bracket to clear the air intake on my relocated turbo it made shifting very hard. So something to think about.

Also you don't want to lower the rear of the motor. You cause axle alignment issues doing that and will split a CV shaft on the 1st bump you hit and send chunks of it flying. Same thing happens when you install the front motor mount insert upside down and rock the motor back. Get the front and side mounts installed then you can build a solid rear strut but do not preload it in any direction. l use a 1" galvanized pipe, a pipe cap with a hole drilled through the top so a bolt can go through it, two 3/8" energy suspension strut rod bushings, a bolt with enough of a shoulder that the bushings ride on the shoulder around the trans bracket so the threads don't rub on the bushings. You bolt that to the trans bracket just snug with a nylock nut and the nice big factory washers. You don't want to crank it down. Just snug. Then you can mark the hole for the bracket on the Kmember and drill through and install the stock bolt there. ZERO Preload! This will keep the motor from moving but then won't rattle the car to death. I like to use an MP side mount and a filled drivers side mount. The front mount can be solid as well but I avoid the Polybushings front mount because it rocks the motor back which throws the axles out of alignment and causes more oil to sit in the head before draining back.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Actually, now I have no plans of force-lowering the back of engine. The need for this was only with the misaligned/defective front mount. In hindsight, I understand that this made the engine tilt slightly clockwise (seen from the right) and created some strange angle where shifting worked fine with /only/ lowered back.
Now, probably the angle has changed so I will measure and check everything from start again.

But, since I actually could find a working position, this makes me hope that there should be no need for adjusting below shiftstick. Keep fingers crossed.

I have not had any problems with the CV joints but I will be going through the measures just to make sure.

I am using a M14 thread for the homemade torque strut, with a bigger bushing towards crossmember, and with bushings softer than polyurethane. More like regular shock strut rubber.

Thanks again!
 
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