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Discussion Starter #1
So after a winter of diagnosing my engine not running properly, and a special thanks to NAJ for all the help, the engine runs just fine... but now I have SMOKE coming from the valve cover or injection rail, or somewhere.

Hopefully the video will load and you can give me an idea.

The injectors were replaced as the #1 and #2 were gummed up and leaking into the cylinder.

Valve cover got a new Felpro gasket set and Black RTV.

Thoughts???

Thanks

Don
 

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What are we working on?

Smoke is from oil leakage onto a hot surface, have you cleaned the engine which will make it easier to spot?
 

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This isn't likely to help. But I had smoke coming from my dipstick tube on a used car I purchased. It turns out that the PCV valve was hopelessly clogged and stuck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What are we working on?

Smoke is from oil leakage onto a hot surface, have you cleaned the engine which will make it easier to spot?
1987 SHELBY Charger
Turbo I
All stock

I have not cleaned the engine as of yet.

The video did not post. I took it with my iPhone, so it is in a quicktime format which must not be one of the acceptable formats. I am going to post it to YouTube and include a link in another post.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This isn't likely to help. But I had smoke coming from my dipstick tube on a used car I purchased. It turns out that the PCV valve was hopelessly clogged and stuck.
Thanks, but not the dipstick. PCV is new and working. This is coming from under the intake manifold.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
proper instructions for the cork front and rear gaskets...

open lid of garbage can
insert gaskets into can
close lid
This was the first time I used the cork. I did however put black RTV into the groove before putting the cork gaskets on, then I put the valve cover on the floor so the TRV would hold the gaskets and they would be flat. Before installing the cover a few days later, I put RTV onto the gaskets (cork, not the rubber end caps) and let it get tacky, then I put it onto the head, pressed lightly, let it sit for two hours, installed the bolts, tightened just a bit until I saw the RTV squeeze, waited until the next day to tighten.

Maybe I just still have oil on the exhaust left over from when it leaked the first time. The leaks were obvious when I removed the cover.
 

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The smoke looks like blow-by to me. You said "I did however put black RTV into the groove before putting the cork gaskets on".

Somebody help me here. If I remember correctly there are at least three types of valve cover flanges. The stamped steel cover with Flat Flanges that uses Black RTV on the sides and the molded SEALs at each Cover End. The other two covers that are aluminum were grooved. One had a narrow 1/8" grove that was sealed with Black RTV on the sides and with the rubber molded seals at each end. The third type had a grove that was about 1/4" inch wide and used a one piece molded gasket.

So before you proceed one of the engine builders on here needs to help us determine just which cover you have installed.
 

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I would let the engine idle for at least 30 minutes while watching it with a fire extinguisher handy to see if the smoke goes away. But to me not knowing how long the car had been running, and not being able to really see anything else it looks like just old leaked oil or assembly smoke that takes a bit to burn off.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The smoke looks like blow-by to me. The other two covers that are aluminum were grooved. One had a narrow 1/8" grove that was sealed with Black RTV on the sides and with the rubber molded seals at each end. The third type had a grove that was about 1/4" inch wide and used a one piece molded gasket.
I am not sure where the blow by would be coming from as there are no open ports on the back of my valve cover other than the tube going into my PCV.

I do have an aluminum valve cover, and I would say it is the 1/4" wide style, but.... I have never seen a one piece gasket in my car since I have owned it, starting in 1991. I can't even find a part number for a one piece gasket. The one I installed was two rubber pieces for the ends and two cork ones for the front and rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I would let the engine idle for at least 30 minutes while watching it with a fire extinguisher handy to see if the smoke goes away. But to me not knowing how long the car had been running, and not being able to really see anything else it looks like just old leaked oil or assembly smoke that takes a bit to burn off.
Interesting that you mention that. I was just about to go out into the garage with a beverage and let it run for a bit.:grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, Good News and Bad news.

Good news, whatever oil was on the manifold burned off and is no longer smoking.

Bad News, the horseshoe shaped gasket on the airbox side is leaking oil and spraying onto the throttle body when the radiator fan turns on. And to make things worse, the rear corner valve cover bolt hole is stripped out and the corner missing off the head... and the front corner is the same. So at the moment, I have the four center bolts and one corner bolt (front timing cover) holding the valve cover.

Now I need new solutions... and NO, I am not taking the head off the car to install a new head.

Has anyone had luck with those aluminum welding rods?

It's ALWAYS something.....
 

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You know what the solutions are, you just don't want to hear it. Aluminum alloy welding rods typically melt at 700+° so your not getting a propane or MAP gas torch anywhere near that hot to melt the alloy to the head. The head needs to be heated beyond 700°, not the alloy rod. It also has to be perfectly clean since it doesn't use any sort of flux. At least not the rods I've seen. It also takes practice to solder with these rods.

What caused the stripped holes and broken off corners? Dried RTV in the bolt holes and when tightened they hydro-locked the blind holes. Either that or severe over tightening. You should always chase the threads of the valve cover bolts with a tap EVERY time when using this style of valve cover. After you fix the cylinder head, you might want to think about investing in a 1989 and up valve cover. Those are the ones that used the one piece gasket design. No RTV is required, and typically valve cover gasket can be re-used several times before replacement.

You could repair the one stripped thread with a heli-coil insert. That will fix that one but the others with broken off corners need to be repaired by welding. Yes they can be repaired, but it will require cylinder head removal, welding, drilling and re-tapping.
 

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well the broken off corners are going to be a problem

but for common knowledge I'll put out that if you have a turbo valve cover and a striped valve cover bolt hole you can quick fix it with a small block or big block dodge valve cover bolt

it's std imperial thread .. and just large enough to cut a nice new thread into the striped out metric hole
IF you thread it in just like a thread tap
in some , out some
in some more further
back out
etc .. until the bolt is tight

other brand car mfg bolts would be the same thread but Idono about the length
 

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Discussion Starter #16
You know what the solutions are, you just don't want to hear it.

What caused the stripped holes and broken off corners?
At the moment, I don't have the time to hear them with a new work schedule (I work 8:00 am to 8:00 pm through the summer).

I don't mind getting an '89 valve cover if it would help my cause.

As far as what broke them, not sure. Probably when my cam was replaced years ago by a garage, they tightened the corners too much because when I took the bolts out last winter, the corners just fell off when I unscrewed the bolts. One (passenger rear) had the nut on it for the stud just laying there because the stud was snapped off. I hate having garages work on my cars for just such a reason.

Putting a replacement head on for this seems like a real pain, and then you don't know if the head is good, and all the aches and pains that go with that. Annoying.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
well the broken off corners are going to be a problem

but for common knowledge I'll put out that if you have a turbo valve cover and a striped valve cover bolt hole you can quick fix it with a small block or big block dodge valve cover bolt

I wish it were just stripped. HeliCoil would be a fine solution. Just no material to bite into.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Wait, the actual head is broken off? I have never seen one, can you take some pictures?
There are three pictures below. If they load in the right order, the first one shows the Drivers Front (cylinder 4) part of the block totally missing. The second is the Passenger Rear, which should have a head on it, but broke off and the threads are still in the block. And the last one, which didn't focus correctly, is the Drivers Rear where a piece of the head is missing where the bolt to hold the valve cover goes into. Head1.jpg

Head2.jpg

Head3.jpg
 

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looking at your pics I can see at least one corner was epoxied back on
it works , once - maybe

I had one break like that years ago - same repair

I only had one corner busted off so I was able to continue using the head
I just had to be really careful to EVENLY torque the valve cover down
 
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