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Hello everyone,

I have a 1987 daytona shelby Z engine build going on. Just wondering how i should approach port and polish of the two piece. I had read to take the to halves apart and do them each piece separately and port match between each half as well. I was thinking of doing this stuff myself to save money but will shop it if it is over my head, or even looking into an upgraded intake (if such exists). What does everyone think i should do? any input is appreciated.

-Stu
 

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it is pretty easy. Cut the bumps down carefully to make sure you don't cut through. Raise the roof of the port up till you have a 1/16" below the injector worth of meet left. Cut the TB opening as far around the corner as you can up to a 52mm TB. Get 4-6" mandrels with 2" x 12" 80 grit sand paper and carefully sand down all of the roughness in the runners. Then hit the whole thing with 120 grit and finally hit the whole thing with 3 piece fine scotch bright. Do not match port the lower piece unless you buy an expensive upper plenum. That is the only important part, if you burn though removing the bumps it is easy to have the whole welded and fixed.


 

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BTW these are WITHOUT adding welds to the bumps, you can get this far without welding. This is where being good comes in lol
 

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Looks nice. :thumb: I need to do some more work on my stocker for my slightly ported head, but I will leave that for the next round of stuff. lol Nice work on that mani.
 

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Looks nice. :thumb: I need to do some more work on my stocker for my slightly ported head, but I will leave that for the next round of stuff. lol Nice work on that mani.
Thanks, manifolds are pretty easy, just need the right tools:thumb:
 

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doing an intake manifold is a good introduction to "porting";
it's not overly difficult, but does require patience, some skill, and it helps to be systematic.
I prefer an 1/4" electric die grinder to air (a Dremel is way too small)

you can do a LOT with 2-3 carbides and a 'porting kit' (includes abrasive rolls, cones, etc)

in increasing order of Benefit vs. time, talent, tools/materials, I suggest:

1. 'port match' manifold to head, blend in ~2"
2. open TB inlet to 52mm, blend in ~2" (get 52mm TB too ;)
3. polish runners
4. further/better blending of ports & TB inlet
 

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I have lots of questions,I myself am about to do some porting,maybe my questions are wondered by others.


Harbor Freight has an electric die grinder reasonably priced.

In the opinion of those who have done this type of work,would this grinder suffice?
The only thing I don't like about this grinder,is that its seems to be "full on" of 25,000 rpms and not indexable....Problem area?

- Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices



I do use at work the carbon steel ,is carbon steel used a lot or does abrasive stone carry the largest work load?

I can assume that carbon steel requires more attention to what your doing,and might be quicker if you don't let it get away from you.


Then I can imagine that abrasive stone might be best for final grinding prep before polish steps are being done,or am I off on this too?

Lastly,what specific bit carries the largest work load?

I'm also assuming that for a "typical/moderate/semi pro" port job done correctly,one could expect about 2 hrs per runner?
 

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that harbor freight die grinder will work Great

you need to be able to adjust the speed;
to slow mine down I use a 'variac', like this
Acifica, Inc.

but you could just use a light dimmer switch, altho its not "good" for the electric motor

you dont use stones on non-ferrous metal like aluminum ;
they just load up, then dont cut

carbon steel cutters are probably fine for aluminum,
for cast iron (like an exh. mani) you will need carbide

my biggest is a 1/2" diameter cylinder, like the 3rd one here, but I found one for <$15
Cylinder-Radius Carbide Burrs - TP Tools & Equipment
 

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Dewalt DW887 Die Grinder- Dewalt Die Grinders - Die grinder - Dewalt
Go big or go home :First TD: When it comes to running long mandrels you want a real quality grinder, you want something that doesn't bounce. Then your not bending tools. As far as short bits and mild work the cheap ones work.

Air sucks hard core, what used to take days takes hours. I am porting an iron Cummins head right now, I'll have 2 hours in the bowls total.... You can't do it with POS air tools.

However, you go slow and you need to push very lightly with a real grinder. The Dewalt will blow through aluminum like a chain saw through a loaf of bread. I stick my hand on the head that holds the end of the tool to brace my self. Then lean into it slowly and make my cuts. If you grabs on you the Dewalt will leave lines that look like power lunz :eek:

Parts list.

3/8" non furous alunimum tree shaped carbides. The shorty and a long one 6"
3/8" regular carbide cutters, both tree shape long and short versions.
1/2" regular carbide cutter, tree shaped, this is a short big one.
mandrels for use with 1/2" x 2" sand paper roles. Get 1 shorty and 3 long ones
80 grit 1/2" x 2" sand paper rolls and 120 grit. About 10 80s and 20 120s

wrap around the head clear safety goggles, If there is one thing the Pope knows is safety. I have dug more shards of metal out of my eyes than I can count. Mostly because I port in the winter and I fog them. The last time I dug a shard out of my eyes I have the glasses on, then my head had metal in my eye brows. When I removed the glasses it flipped sh!t into my eyes, done.

Next get a 3M dust mask, a real one with 2 disks. Cheap ones get your glasses fogged and don't really work. Then get rubber gloves, the thing cloth type. Then game on!:two cents:
 

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I can speak for the worst case scenario on metallic dust shards in dust form,I did so at work with a sawz all on steel,I cleaned up but apparently not enough!

After work I went home and hours later went to sleep,during sleep that dust had "sanded" a peice of my cornea to the point a small section peeled off.

Went to the hospital and couldn't use my eye for almost 2 weeks,since that time that same area of cornea abrasion reoccurred 3 times shortly after that, from mild irritation issues.
It seems the cornea doesn't heal well,especially if you cut it like I did in a square peeled section the first time.
 

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I have had the razor blade slivers stick straight out of my eye and shred the inside of my eye lids.
 

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Dremels are NOT "too small" especially when cutting aluminum! I've ported both iron and aluminum heads with carbide bits in my variable speed Dremel. And a Turbo exhaust manifold also. It took a while but it got done very nicely.

Aluminum cuts quickly, so it's better to go slowly than to try and hog it all out fast and get gouges and dips in places you didn't want them.
 

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Carbide only way to go, with wd-40 then sand barrels. Nice snap-on air die grinders work great, you can control rpm very well. imop
 

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Dremels are NOT "too small" especially when cutting aluminum! I've ported both iron and aluminum heads with carbide bits in my variable speed Dremel. And a Turbo exhaust manifold also. It took a while but it got done very nicely.

Aluminum cuts quickly, so it's better to go slowly than to try and hog it all out fast and get gouges and dips in places you didn't want them.
Last I priced one a Dremel cost more than my Dewalt though, which with the sleeve even uses 1/8" bits. But not using one sucks. I don't know how many of you have ever seen a 12v Cummins head before. I can say they look worse than a 782 and that's saying something. Large iron 1/4" x 3/4" x 1" humps in the intakes to get cut down. Even the guides need 1/4" cuts to cut them down. How long did it take to do all of my bowls? And do a "good" job as it was basically a quirky, no polishing. Took 2 hours......

They cost more and are toy for women around the house for carving pumpkins. Which BTW if you buy the same one in orange you can get a Dremel really cheap. But the only one to have is the flex shaft. But regardless it all comes down to how much your time is worth, my time is about $50 an hour. So in this case the Dremel is too small. Kind of like saying that I can walk to Vegas from here. Physically my feet can get the job done but there is no way I will spend that kind of time.
 

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I used a dremel for my head and intake because that's all I had. It worked well. It did take a long time, but it should have since it was my first time.
 

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My Dremel is the variable speed and I have the flex shaft extension for it, I forgot to mention that. It'd be tough to port with it without the flex shaft!
 

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My Dremel is the variable speed and I have the flex shaft extension for it, I forgot to mention that. It'd be tough to port with it without the flex shaft!
I have 1/4" x 6" carbides. So I can reach down into the ports pretty easy. Most of the time I cut them down to 4" so there stronger.


On the pumpkin carving one you can get it, the regular Dremel for about $20. Then spend $20 on bits and have a working dremel if you want one. It is the same unit other than the clear orange body.
 
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